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With Grocery Prices Soaring, This High-Tech Food Play Belongs on Your Shopping List

Aside from the continued sell-off in U.S. tech stocks, one of yesterday’s top financial news stories was the fact that U.S. inflation is accelerating – and at a pace that’s exceeding forecasts.

And the surge in food prices is one of the big catalysts…

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Global Investing Archives - Page 10 of 36 - Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From- Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

  • Defensive Investing: Use Dollar-Cost Averaging to Reduce Volatility Risks

    Dollar-cost averaging has long been a strategic staple among mutual fund buyers. Longer-term investors use it to smooth out the effects of short-term price fluctuations, but the tactic seldom has been practical for purchasers of individual stocks – that is until now.

    For those unfamiliar with the strategy, dollar-cost averaging – also known as constant-dollar investing – involves the regular purchase of a smaller fixed-dollar amount worth of shares over time, as opposed to the lump-sum purchase of a large number of shares at once. For example, rather than buy $1,200 worth of shares of fictitious company XYZ in January, you might buy $100 worth of XYZ shares each month for the full year.

    The technique offers several advantages for fund investors:

    • Because you are investing a fixed-dollar amount at regular intervals, you don't have to be concerned with trying to time the markets.
    • Since the fixed-dollar amount you invest buys more shares when prices are low and fewer when they are high, your average cost basis levels out over time. This reduces the risk that you might pay too high a price by making a lump-sum purchase at the wrong time.
    • The lower average cost basis mutes the impact of short-term volatility on your existing holdings.
    • You can build a sizable position in a single fund, even if you never have a large sum of money to invest at any one time.

  • An Anemic Economic Recovery Keeps the Fed From Focusing on Inflation

    With interest rates near zero and a balance sheet that's in excess of $2 trillion, U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke would be very glad to offload some of the Fed's obligations. But so far he's has been unable to do so, as an anemic economic recovery continues to monopolize his attention.

    The central bank yesterday (Tuesday) announced that it would reinvest the proceeds from expiring mortgage-backed securities into longer-term U.S. Treasuries. The move should help a weakening economy by keeping mortgage rates low. And while it also may boost inflationary pressures, the central bank feels it had little choice.

    "Information received since the Federal Open Market Committee met in June indicates that the pace of recovery in output and employment has slowed in recent months," the Federal Open Market Committee said.

  • Investing Strategies: How to Build a Global-Investing Portfolio Using ETFs

    It wasn't all that long ago that global investing was an activity that was restricted to only the wealthiest U.S. investors. If you weren't one of America's ultra-rich, you weren't able to access foreign markets.

    That began to change in the 1950s, with the advent of international and global mutual funds, and access further expanded over the next three decades with the introduction of single-country closed-end funds. Today, thanks to the recent explosion in exchange-traded funds (ETFs), investing in overseas stocks is now almost as easy as targeting a given market sector here at home.

    In fact, although it has been a mere 17 years since the first ETF began trading in the United States (in 1993), the most recent count finds more than 290 international, regional and foreign-country-focused funds listed on the various U.S. exchanges – enough to entice any investor with even a modest yen for overseas portfolio exposure.

  • Drought Forces Russia to Ban Grain Exports

    Russia yesterday (Thursday) banned grain exports after unrelenting heat left the country with its worst drought in at least a half-century.

    Wheat rose to a 23-month high after Russia, the world's third-largest grower, announced a ban beginning Aug.15 that will last through the end of the year. Corn and rice prices also surged yesterday after Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said a ban on those grains would be "appropriate" in light of skyrocketing prices. 

    Domestic grain prices gained 19% last week, faster than at the peak of the global food crisis in 2008.  The ban includes wheat, barley, rye, corn and flour exports, according to the government decree that also set aside nearly $1.2 billion for stricken farmers.

  • Cashing in on Canada: Four Ways to Profit – Big – From the World's "Safest Economy"

    Canada is more than just back bacon, maple syrup, and hardscrabble-mining claims. It's a leader in natural resources, precious metals, and such alternative-energy investments as oil sands.

    In fact, Canada right now boasts one of the world's most compelling targets for investors' hard-earned money. Consider that:

    • Through 2008, Canada enjoyed 12 straight years of budget surpluses.
    • Since the outset of the global financial crisis, not a single Canadian bank failed.
    • Canada was the first G-7 nation to raise interest rates.
    • And while Canada has already reaped the benefits of a full 10 years worth of a full-blown bull market in commodities, there are at least 10 years more to go.

    Added together, this points to a major potential payoff for those who invest in Canada right now.

    For the four best profit plays in the world's safest economy, please read on…

  • Canada: The World's Economic Compass

    If you're looking for a reliable investment, look no further than our neighbor to the north. This oft-overlooked country is quickly emerging as one of the world's strongest economies. Find out why in this report…

  • Hungary's Spat with the IMF and EU Could Signal Another Crisis to Come

    The biggest financial news story out of the Europe this summer is getting very little play in the U.S. mainstream press. However, it has the potential to torpedo the European Union (EU), and has disastrous implications for borrowing costs worldwide.

    Basically, a miniature banking crisis is festering in Hungary. If it isn't contained, it could grow into a genuine crisis that infects the secondary lending markets around the world.

    Hungary is supposed to have about $30 billion in domestic liquidity for exchange, the equivalent of about five months of capital in its national account.  But it won't be getting additional funds from the EU machine in Brussels, or the International Monetary Fund (IMF), anytime soon.

  • Four Ways to Profit From Britain's Surprising Post-Election Rebound

    I have been negative on Britain for a decade – and with good reason. The British economy was over-dependent on financial services, and government spending – at greater than 50% of gross domestic product (GDP) – was out of control.

    However, the new government that took office in May has prompted me to reconsider my investment viewpoint. The new coalition has made progress on both of these once-worrisome issues.

    And that means the British market is now one that investors should very carefully consider.

    Let me explain…

    To find out about the four stocks that stand to benefit most from Britain's unexpected turnaround, please read on…

  • Canada's Economy Casts a Long Shadow Over its U.S. Counterpart

    Canada's economy has consistently outperformed that of the United States since the beginning of the financial crisis. And while it's showing signs of slowing down, Canada's pending decline will be far shallower than that of the United States, and its rebound more dynamic.

    Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) expanded by 6.1% in the first quarter of the year – the highest rate of growth among developed nations – and the country is expected to lead Group Seven (G7) nations in economic growth for at least the next two years.

    The reasons are many:

    • Canada's banking system is sound.
    • It has a generous bounty of resources.
    • Its economy is more service-based than it's been in years past.
    • Corporate interests have less influence over government policy.
    • And it has far less government debt.

  • Singapore's Economy Leads Asia's Rebound With Record-Breaking 2010 Growth

    Singapore's economy grew at a record-breaking pace in the first half of 2010, boosting Asian economic growth that is outpacing the rest of the world.

    Singapore's Ministry of Trade and Industry reported yesterday (Wednesday) that gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 18.1% in the first half of the year, expanding 26% in the second quarter from the previous three months, and 19.3% in the second quarter from the same 2009 period.

    The rise is the country's biggest since record-keeping began in 1975.