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Keith Fitz-Gerald- Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

Keith is the Chief Investment Strategist for Money Map Press. A seasoned market analyst and professional trader with more than 30 years of global experience, Keith is one of very few experts to correctly see both the dot.bomb crisis and the ongoing financial crisis coming ahead of time - and one of even fewer to help millions of investors around the world successfully navigate them both. Forbes.com recently hailed him as a "Market Visionary."

He is a regular on FOX Business, CNBC, and CNBC Asia, and his observations have been featured in Bloomberg, The Wall Street Journal, WIRED, Forbes, and MarketWatch.

Keith has been leading The Money Map Report since 2008, our flagship newsletter with 80,000+ members. He's also the editor of the High Velocity Profits trading service. In his new weekly Total Wealth, Keith has taken everything he's learned over a notable career and distilled it down to just three steps for individual investors. Sign up is free at totalwealthresearch.com.

Keith holds a BS in management and finance from Skidmore College and an MS in international finance (with a focus on Japanese business science) from Chaminade University. He regularly travels the world in search of investment opportunities others don't yet see or understand.

Keith'S LATEST HEADLINES

  • Why the Fed's Latest Rescue Effort is Doomed

    World markets got a nice tailwind yesterday (Wednesday) on news that the U.S. Federal Reserve is stepping into the fray along with other central banks to boost liquidity and support the global economy.

    Of course it's nice to see stocks get a hefty boost, but to be honest I'd rather see them rising on real news.

    Not that this isn't a good development in terms of stock values – but come on, guys. When things are so bad that the Fed has to step into global markets and bail out the other bankers in the world who can't wipe their own noses, we have serious problems.

    Think about it.

    The Fed is going to collaborate with the European Central Bank (ECB), the Bank of England (BOE), the Bank of Japan, the Swiss National Bank and the Bank of Canada (BOC) to lower interest rates on dollar liquidity swaps to make it cheaper for banks around the world to trade in dollars as a means of providing liquidity in their markets.

    Put another way, now our government is directly involved in saving somebody else's bacon at a time when, arguably, we don't have our own house in order.

    The Fed is cutting the amount that it charges for international access to dollars effectively in half from 100 basis points to 50 basis points over a basic rate.

    The central bank says the move is designed to "ease strains in financial markets and thereby mitigate the effects of such strains on the supply of credits to households and businesses and so help foster economic activity."

    Who writes this stuff?

    Businesses are flush with more cash than they've had in years. The banks are, too. But the problem is still putting that cash in motion — just as it has been since this crisis began.

    From Bad to Worse

    I've have written about this many times in Money Morning. You can stimulate all you want with low rates, but if businesses cannot see a reason to spend money to turn a profit, they won't. And there's going to be little the government can do to encourage them to spend the estimated $2 trillion a Federal Reserve report estimates they're sitting on.

    Similarly, if banks cannot see a reason to lend with reasonable security that loans will be repaid, they won't. And there's nothing the central bank can do about it, either. Neither low interest rates nor low-cost debt swaps will change the fact that companies and individuals are shedding debt as fast as they can despite the cost of borrowing being almost zero.

    If anything, the Fed's newest harebrained scheme is going to make things worse. Absent profitable lending, many banks are already turning to bank fees and – like the airlines that are widely perceived to be nickel-and-diming passengers – this is understandably irking customers. Many are changing banks as a result, further fueling a negative feedback loop.

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  • Why Warren Buffett Is Buying – And You Should Be Too
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  • Three Psychological Stumbling Blocks That Kill Profits
  • How Much Cash Should You Hold?
  • What the World Will Look Like if Occupy Wall Street Wins
  • Inverse Funds: How To Profit From Inverse Funds – Without Losing Your Shirt
  • The Market's Next 1,000-Point Move
  • How to Invest: Finding Profits in Any Market
  • Don't Buy Into Europe's Latest Rescue Effort – The Continent's Banks Are About to Go Bust
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