Press Esc to close

Welcome to Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

Close

Welcome to the "Wolf Creek Pass" School of Monetary Policy

I don’t know if you folks remember that hit ditty: a humorous tune about two truckers attempting to manhandle an out-of-control 1948 Peterbilt down the “other side” of Wolf Creek Pass – a death-taunting section of U.S. Highway 160 where the elevation drops a hefty 5,000 feet in a relatively short distance.

The song’s two characters – a truck driver named Earl and his brother, who’s his partner as well as the song’s narrator – are taking a flatbed load of chickens on a speedy trip down this winding, two-lane Colorado highway. After the narrator gives Earl the above-mentioned warning, the ancient semi’s brakes fail.

From there on down, the narrator tells us that the brothers’ trip “just wasn’t real pretty.” The truck careened around hairpins and switchbacks, and then raced at an uncontrolled 110 mph toward a tunnel with “clearance to the 12-foot line” – with chicken crates sadly “stacked to 13-9.”

The drivers and the runaway Peterbilt “went down and around and around and down ’til we run outta ground at the edge of town… and bashed into the side of the feed store – in downtown Pagosa Springs.”

Believe it or not, I started thinking about this funny old country tune the other night – right after I’d read a piece about QE3 and the U.S. Federal Reserve.

As zany as it first sounds, the parallels are striking.

Your Advisors

Shah Gilani- Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

Author Image for Shah GilaniShah Gilani
RESEARCH SERVICES

Shah is considered one of the world's foremost experts on the credit crisis.

He not only called for the implosion of the U.S. financial markets, he also predicted the historic rebound that began in March 2009. Shah's open letters to the White House, Congress, and U.S. Treasury secretaries outlined detailed policy options that have been lauded by academics and legislators alike.

His experience and knowledge uniquely distinguish Shah as a "trader's trader." Shah ran his first hedge fund in 1982 from his seat on the floor of the Chicago Board of Options Exchange. When the OEX (options on the Standard & Poor's 100) began trading on March 11, 1983, Shah was working in the pit as a market maker. And along with other traders, he popularized what later became known as the VIX (volatility index). He left Chicago to run the futures and options division of the British banking giant Lloyd's TSB.

Shah went on to originate and run a packaged fixed-income trading desk for Roosevelt & Cross Inc., an old-line New York boutique bond firm, and established that company's listed and OTC trading desks. Shah started another hedge fund in 1999, which he ran until 2003, when he retired to develop land holdings with partners.

Today Shah is the editor of Capital Wave Forecast and Short-Side Fortunes. He also writes our most talked-about publication, an e-letter called Wall Street Insights & Indictments, where he reveals how Wall Street's high-stakes game is really played, and how to win it.

Shah studied economics and psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles.