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    10 9 15 economic collapse 1

    Foreign governments buy U.S. debt because of its status as the world’s reserve currency – the American economy has long been viewed as a safe place to invest.

    But that’s all changing now – events that could spark a U.S. economic collapse are already underway…

    The Wall Street Journal revealed this week that China – the largest holder of U.S. investments – is ridding itself of its U.S. investments at the fastest rate in history. Central banks in China, Russia, Brazil, and Taiwan are selling U.S. government bonds at such a pace that it’s caused the most dramatic shift in the $12.8 trillion Treasury market since the 2008-2009 financial crisis.

    Foreign central bankers’ massive offloading of U.S. debt sends a dangerous signal.

    Here’s why…

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China debt

The Economic "Red Wedding" Begins

DJIA futures

I love being right...Does that make me a bad person?

I have been warning for months that the market is overvalued, that the global economy is sick, and that stocks are headed for a fall. While CNBC and the rest of the clueless bulls break out the arm-bands, readers at Money Morning - who have been paying attention - should not have been surprised by what happened last week.

The collapse in commodity prices that began a year ago was a raging canary in the coal mine, screaming that something was wrong in the global economy. And that was the faltering of Chinese growth, which all along had been built on a fragile foundation of debt.

But these numbers don't convey the hard, cold reality of the losses. Let's put some meat on the bones.

The Heart of a China Bull Still Beats Strong

My debate with Gordon Chang on China's future at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference was a stimulating, intellectual exercise.

A healthy market needs a compromise between the bid and ask, and discussions between people who strongly disagree is a great way to promote critical thinking.

Critical thinking is vital to our investment process as a means to ensure that we question assumptions.

A lack of critical thinking sometimes leads to bubbles, such as the one taking place in the parabolic rise in the number of articles foretelling China will experience a "hard landing."

Last fall, more than 1,000 articles questioned the possibility of a "China crash," according to data from BCA Research. This is twice as high as the number in 2004, when fear articles reached 500.

Gordon's bearish pronouncements only added to the extremely negative groupthink surrounding China's economy.

Money Morning Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald, a long-time friend of mine, wrote an excellent article comparing today's doomsday sentiment of China to the naysayers who forecast the demise of the U.S. during the market bottom of March 2009.

Throughout the past century, U.S. stocks went through many secular bear markets.

Keith points to the 1929-1932 period when the Dow Jones Industrial Average declined by nearly 90%, along with pointing out the Dow's loss of more than 52% from 1937 to 1942.

Also, in 1901, 1906, 1916 and 1973, there were four "40-plus% declines," says Keith.

Americans have also endured two world wars, the Great Depression, presidential assassinations and the deadliest terrorist attack ever seen on U.S. soil. What's important for investors to remember was that each significant market decline presented a "great buying opportunity" with U.S. stocks rising double-, or in some cases, triple-digits, writes Keith.

And, over the past 100 years, the Dow gained an outstanding 24,000%.

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