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Two Safe Ways to Profit From the "Alibaba Shockwave Effect"

In the mid-1990s, I was fortunate to meet and start working with an Upstate New York money manager named Anthony M. Gallea.

The relationship began when I attended and wrote stories about some of the investment seminars he periodically held for prospective and existing clients. He then became a “source” for some of the investment stories I periodically wrote for Gannett Newspapers. And we ultimately collaborated on a pretty successful book about “Contrarian Investing” that was published by Prentice Hall.

Along the way, Tony shared some pretty important snippets of investing wisdom…

  • Featured Story

    Eurozone Debt Crisis Exposes What EU Leaders Fear Most

    Flag of EU hanging on the gold flagpole

    European Union leaders have seemingly changed their tune lately on how best to deal with the long-running Eurozone debt crisis.

    Increasingly, EU politicians have been sounding the theme that economic growth - not Eurozone austerity - is the answer, and that deadlines set for reductions in public spending needed to be loosened.

    It started about a month ago, with none other than European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso.

    "While I think this policy [of austerity] is fundamentally right, I think it has reached its limits," Barroso said. "A policy to be successful not only has to be properly designed, it has to have the minimum of political and social support."

    Shortly afterward, French Prime Minister Pierre Moscovici chimed in, "We're witnessing the end of the dogma of austerity."

    Meanwhile, the European Commission seemed to confirm the policy shift when it recently extended the deadlines for most of the troubled EU nations to fix their budget deficits.

    News headlines throughout Europe trumpeted the "end of austerity."

    But what the EU leaders have really done is buy themselves more time by stretching out the Eurozone austerity policies - which are mostly still in place - over a longer period of time.

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    The reason is summed up in two words: Silvio Berlusconi. Read More...