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    How This Great American Dream Is Turning Scam

    Here's a question for you: Has higher education become another great American scam?

    I'm not talking about the rich getting scammed. They get what they pay for. They can afford to be scammed - they know what's up.

    A lot of rich people send their kids to expensive private colleges hoping they'll get a good education that will lead them into their chosen careers.

    But then there are kids who want a higher education because they believe a college education is their ticket to gainful employment and well-compensated careers.


    For them, higher education is increasingly looking like a scam...
  • Financial Scams

  • How to Pick Good Penny Stocks and Avoid the Scams penny stocks_square

    Penny stocks can offer huge profit potentials, but penny stock investing can also be risky when it's not done right.

    This month's meteoric rise of CYNK Technology Corp. (OTC: CYNK) stock is the perfect example. It turns out the gains may be for naught as the SEC has suspended trading while it investigates the company.

    Penny stock investing isn’t just about finding the winners, it’s about avoiding the scams. Here’s how you can start making money from good penny stocks today…
  • Student Loan Debt and the Big Higher Education Scam students square

    Has higher education become another great American scam?

    I'm not talking about the rich getting scammed. They don't wind up saddled with student loan debt after they graduate.

    I'm talking about the kids who want a higher education because they believe it's their ticket to employment and well-compensated careers. They pay for it themselves, or their parents cosign on loans or take out personal loans on behalf of their kids' college dreams.

    For them, higher education is increasingly looking like a scam. Here's why...
  • High-Frequency Trading: Game the System and Get Rich in Just 8 Simple Steps Stock cheat

    I don't know about you, but I'm ordering Michael Lewis' new book "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt" - and I'm ordering it today.

    Of course, Michael Lewis is the author of two of the biggest-selling books ever written about Wall Street: "Liar's Poker" (1990), an autobiographical portrait of excessively greedy bond traders during the 1980s, and "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine" (2010), which chronicles the housing bubble that led to the Great Recession in 2007.

    To continue reading, please click here...
  • What High-Frequency Traders Actually Do

    High-frequency trading is fundamentally based on how market participants (for this discussion I'm talking about stock markets) place their orders to buy and sell shares and how HFT players act on those orders.

    For every stock that's traded there is always (or at least it used to be "always") a "bid" and an "ask" price. Sometimes you'll hear the term "offer" or "offered" price, those terms are interchangeable with the term "ask" or "asking price."

    To continue reading, please click here...
  • Classic Cons: 10 Financial Scams Fair-Minded Investors Should Avoid Online investment scams swindled over $559 million dollars from ordinary investors in 2009 alone… and the number of scammers hitting the market is rising daily. In this free report, find out exactly how these scammers are targeting your money… and exactly how to protect yourself. Read More...
  • Combating the Cons: Where Should Victims of Financial Scams Turn? Today's story "Classic Cons: 10 Financial Scams Fair-Minded Investors Should Avoid," describes just a few of the financial scams investors should watch out for. If you have reservations about a potential investment opportunity, or if you've been victimized by a financial scam, you might turn to one or more of the following agencies.

    Better Business Bureau - With offices nationally, in every state and most large and mid-sized cities, the BBB can alert you to problems with local businesses, work-at-home programs, distributorships, sales routes you can buy and other one-on-one type rip-offs. They usually have lists of current online offers that are suspect or drawing lots of complaints. You can access the national BBB Web site at http://www.bbb.org/us/
    and navigate to your home state or city chapter from there.

    U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) - Information is available on all securities-related fraud issues and investment scams, and you can file your own personal complaints or suspicions online at http://www.sec.gov/complaint.shtml. You can write them at: Securities and Exchange Commission, Office of Investor Education & Assistance, 450 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20549-0213, or fax a complaint to 202-942-9634. You also can verify financials and regulatory standing on all publicly traded U.S. companies by accessing the SEC's EDGAR Database at: http://www.sec.gov/edgar.shtml.

    Your SEC complaint can be anonymous or you can provide only limited personal data. However, the more information you give them, the more likely they'll be able to help you. Either way, include specific details about how, why and when you were bilked with any contact info you have on the fraudulent person or company involved.

    Read More...
  • Classic Cons: 10 Financial Scams Fair-Minded Investors Should Avoid When Peter Allen and Carole Bayer Sager wrote the tune "Everything Old Is New Again," they were probably hoping for no more than a Top 40 hit. Instead, the song became an oft-recorded classic, mostly because the title proved a truism in so many areas - especially in the seamy world of financial fraud.

    Indeed, over the past 40 years, only one new entry has been added to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) roster of "Top 10" investment scams - the very broad category of "Internet fraud." The other financial rip-offs listed are merely new versions of tried and true swindles that have been around for decades or more - from Ponzi schemes and pyramid systems to phony stock offerings and commodity cons.

    The big difference is that the one new category - Internet fraud (and the computers on which the Internet operates) - has greatly increased the frequency, speed and effectiveness of the other types of financial fraud, as well as exponentially increasing the scammers' take.

    Read More...
  • Anatomy of a Scam: This "Prime Bank Program" Has Already Cost Investors Billions Two years ago, an associate of mine lost $100,000 because he didn't listen to me. A year ago, I saved a manufacturing company from the same scam. And just last week I saved a friend of mine $300,000. For several years now, a far-fetched but seemingly plausible investment opportunity has been wreaking havoc across the […] Read More...
  • As Financial Scams Go Global, Here’s How to Avoid Being Stung

    [This is the sixth installment of a new series that is exploring ways for investors to recover from the U.S. financial crisis.]

    Bernie Madoff's guilty plea to a decades-long $50 billion-plus Ponzi scheme pretty much guarantees the 70-year-old will have his likeness immortalized on the Mt. Rushmore of scammers.

    The former NASDAQ chairman's December arrest - with collapsing U.S. and overseas stock markets as a backdrop - kicked up a firestorm that has forced investors to take a much-closer look at who was managing their investments. Scores of investors have lost their life savings, retirees found their nest eggs gone and countless charities discovered that they were essentially out of business; the cash that they once handed out to worthy causes had disappeared.

    Read More...