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Cramer Believes Our "Quadruple" on This Stock is Just the Beginning

There’s nothing more gratifying than when a big-name investor – or Wall Street in general – starts “pounding the table” on a stock that we already recommended to you… and that you’re already making money on.

The reason for this simple: Once we’ve made a recommendation – and you’ve had the chance to take a position – these Wall Street types do the “heavy lifting” to bring in the liquidity that will drive your holdings higher.

And that’s just what’s happening with…

  • Featured Story

    Time to Buy These "Out of Print" Assets

    From the Editor: We've been tracking this threat for years, ever since Keith Fitz-Gerald brought it to your attention back in January 2010. Today, Resources Specialist Peter Krauth weighs in on some recent developments in this story, because three of the commodities he covers can protect you. The Fed can't print these things... Here's Peter:
    Central banks may have foolish policies, but central bankers are no dummies.
    They know exactly what they're doing. They even comprehend a few of the implications, too.
    Which is why it's interesting that some American central bankers have suggested doing away with the debt ceiling altogether.
    Famed investor Marc Faber recently said, "The question is not tapering. The question is at what point will they increase the asset purchases to say $150 [billion], $200 [billion], a trillion dollars a month."
    Faber expects the Fed's current QE4 to become "QE4-ever."
    That could mean years of money printing and ultra-low rates.
    Even bond king Bill Gross recently chimed in his latest monthly outlook that "The United States (and global economy) may have to get used to financially repressive - and therefore low policy rates - for decades to come."
    Either way, don't depend on the Fed to save you. You can save yourself


    And now you'll need to...
  • inflation 2013

  • BREAKING: Bernanke to Continue Controversial Bond Buying Program

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke announced in a press conference this afternoon that the U.S. Federal Reserve will continue quantitative easing, the controversial bond buying program, for now. Chairman Bernanke expressed concern over rising borrowing costs and their effect on the economy, saying that the situation calls for continued quantitative easing.

    Analysts on and off Wall Street were surprised, to put it mildly. Markets responded very well to news of continued easy-money policy. The mainstream consensus was that the Fed would begin to taper off its $85 billion monthly bond purchases by around $10 or $15 billion each month. Current pricing just didn't take continued bond buying into account, and the bullish reaction was immediate, intense, and widespread.

    To continue reading, please click here...
  • The Best Investments to Hold When Interest Rates Rise Pears

    Inflation can be tough to contend with, yet investors should guard against inflation lest it eat away at their portfolios - which isn't hard to do if they know the best investments to hold when inflation rates rise.

    Official interest rates are notoriously unreliable - outright false at times - which can downplay or underestimate the situation. Don't trust the numbers. Make that mistake, and your investments' value can evaporate before your eyes.

    To continue reading, please click here...
  • The Misunderstood Link Between Oil, Natural Gas and Inflation Energy prices, particularly oil and natural gas, are no longer a direct driver of inflation. Oil and gas prices have been resilient in the absence of inflation.

    The deeper reason for the upward move in prices has been the Fed's easy money and low interest rate policies.

    Oil and gas are giving investors greater leverage to make profits in upcoming market gyrations. Dr. Kent Moors explains.< Read More...
  • Why Veteran Trader Says Inflation in 2013 Is Imminent Currency USD inflated no shadow

    Is a spike in the monetary base - currency in circulation plus bank reserves at the Fed - the first sign of imminent inflation?

    Art Cashin, the well-respected director of floor operations at the New York Stock Exchange for UBS, recently told King World News the increase in the monetary base may well be a sign of impending inflation.

    Monetary base, sometimes called high-powered money, is the basis for the bank lending that drives our economy. When interest rates are normal, banks use their reserves for lending.

    Unfortunately, these are not normal times. The U.S. Federal Reserve and other central banks around the world continue to hold interest rates at zero.

    Zero interest rates mean zero returns. Investors don't get paid for investing. Banks don't get paid enough interest to compensate for the risk of lending money into the economy. Looking at it another way, there is no penalty for doing nothing with your money.

    To continue reading, please click here...

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