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You Just Pocketed 89% From Our Recent Inflation Warning

We’ve been telling you folks for months that the pesky surge in prices we know as “inflation” has been showing up in different spots within the U.S. economy.

In early April, Shah Gilani – editor of our Capital Wave Forecast and Short Side Fortunes advisory services – told us that food prices were spiking. And he even re-recommended an “old friend”.

Folks who acted on that advice have pocketed a 27% gain in less than four months…

  • Oil Prices

  • Goldman Sachs Is Manipulating Gold Prices Right Before Your Eyes Company GS

    If you want a lesson on how to manipulate gold prices, you need only look at what Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (NYSE: GS) has been doing over the past few months.

    Goldman set the table by predicting a turn in gold prices back in December 2012, which no doubt contributed to the precious metal's 5% decline in the first two months of the year.

    At the end of February, Goldman issued a research report that said the big Wall Street bank had soured on the yellow metal, and dropped its three-month target for gold prices from $1,825 an ounce to $1,615, its six-month forecast from $1,805 to $1,600, and its one-year outlook from $1,800 to $1,550.

    Then, just yesterday (Wednesday), Goldman doubled down on its negative outlook for gold prices.

    The bank's new targets for gold prices are $1,530 in three months, $1,490 in six months and $1,390 in one year.

    The double whammy - two downgrades in two months - had its intended effect, as gold prices fell 2%, to $1,558.80, after Goldman released its report. It was the biggest single-day percentage drop for gold in nearly six months.

    "If you've ever suspected gold prices are being manipulated, you're not alone - and you're right, they are," said Money Morning Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald.

    The proof is right in front of us.

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  • Why Oil Prices Aren't Coming Down Despite Big U.S. Oil Boom Energy oil dollar small

    The dual promise of the U.S. shale oil boom was that it would reduce our dependence on foreign oil and lower oil prices that would benefit U.S. consumers via cheaper gasoline.

    But while U.S. oil production continues to rise, and gasoline consumption continues to fall, gas prices have remained stubbornly high: The national average was about $3.65 last week.

    And that trend is expected to continue, with the United States surging past Saudi Arabia as the world's largest producer of crude oil as soon as 2020. Meanwhile, U.S. gasoline demand is at its lowest in more than a decade - down to 8.7 million barrels a day.

    Facts like that have led some pundits to predict falling oil prices. Last year, some politicians were promising that stepped-up U.S. oil production could lower gasoline prices to $2.50 a gallon.

    Frustrated U.S. drivers struggling to cope with high gas prices were eager to believe such promises, no matter how unlikely.

    Unfortunately, all that new U.S. oil, while helpful in some ways, will not have much effect on gas prices - either now or in the foreseeable future.

    "The problem is that prices are not just reflective of new supplies, either too much or too little," explained Money Morning Global Energy Strategist Dr. Kent Moors. "By focusing only on how much is there, these analysts provide a fundamentally distorted view of the oil market."

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  • Why the "Death of Peak Oil" Still Won't Mean Cheap Oil Energy oil barrel small

    Today (Wednesday) an analyst from Citigroup became the latest lemming to declare the death of peak oil.

    In a report entitled "The End is Nigh," Seth Kleinman says a combination of flattening demand and rising supply will cause oil prices to slide slightly by the end of the decade to $80-$90 a barrel.

    But while oil companies have made many large new discoveries over the past few years, including big shale oil finds in North America and Australia as well as deepwater finds in the Gulf of Mexico, that doesn't mean oil prices will fall.

    In fact, according to Money Morning Global Energy Strategist Dr. Kent Moors, it's far more likely that oil prices will continue to rise over the next decade.

    Moors points out what most other analysts seem to be missing - that all of the new oil finds present many challenges that will add to the cost of extraction.

    "None of this new volume is light, sweet crude," Moors said. "The average wellhead costs continue to go up, and that moves its way downstream to processing, wholesale, and retail."

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  • Forget the Kneejerk Reactions, Oil Prices Are Going Higher The doomsayers are once again predicting a crash in oil prices. These oil price bears must really be getting desperate. Dr. Kent Moors explains why oil is only going up. Read More...
  • Oil Companies Hope for New Opportunity in Energy-Rich Venezuela Despite some 300B barrels of oil reserves, the nation has failed to unlock the profit potential within its borders. But news of President Hugo Chavez's passing this month has sparked speculation that it's time for an energy renaissance. Read More...
  • Buy, Sell or Hold: Strong Oil Prices Make Apache Corp. a Good Bet Apache Corp. (NYSE: APA) is not your average oil company. Even with oil prices still comfortably in the $90.00 range, Apache shares recently fell below their 52-week lows. In fact, since April 2011 Apache shares are down by 44%. But with a strong balance sheet and healthy sales forecasts, this company is doing all the right things. Read More...
  • Why Bigger Isn't Always Better in the Oil Business Traditionally, size has determined the impact and profitability of an oil company. But today the stage is set for smaller, well-positioned companies. Energy investors should keep an eye on these "non majors." Here's why. Read More...
  • What's Keeping Oil Prices Down – for Now, at Least Kent cnbc oil Sequestration, production concerns in China and the political mess in Italy have combined to keep oil prices down, says Money Morning Global Energy Strategist Dr. Kent Moors.

    Speaking on CNBC, Moors said the oil market is now "slightly oversold."

    Moors said increased demand and less refinery capacity being used could increase the oil crack spread in the United States, leading to higher energy prices even if oil prices fall.
    Asked why energy prices are so high, Moors said there are six or seven major factors.

    "The bottom line," he said, "is we have to stop looking at Western Europe and North America when we talk about oil demand because oil demand is being driven essentially worldwide by completely different regions."

    Among them, Moors said, is West Africa, where oil demand is spiking.

    Watch the accompanying video to hear Moors talk more about global oil prices and how they will affect you.

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  • Australia Shale Oil Discovery Continues the Country's "Lucky" Streak Energy oil dollar small

    Investors are well aware of the shale oil revolution in the United States. But the "revolution" does not end here; it is spreading globally to countries as diverse as China and Poland.

    There is one country in particular though that may experience circumstances similar to the United States, if not greater.

    I'm talking about Australia, which has often been called "The Lucky Country." That description was first penned in 1964 by Donald Horne and he actually meant it negatively at the time.

    But in recent decades, the term has been given a positive spin thanks to Australia's abundance of natural resources and its geographical location near the world's biggest consumer of commodities - China.

    And Australia may have struck luck again thanks to the recent announcement of a massive shale oil discovery.

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  • The Arckaringa Basin Could Be the Largest Shale Oil Find of All Time Today I've got new information on what could be the largest shale oil find ever recorded - an estimated 233 billion barrels of recoverable shale oil.
    This has got the entire energy world abuzz.
    That's more that all of the oil in Iran, Iraq, Canada, or Venezuela. And it’s just 30 billion barrels shy of all the reserves in oil-rich Saudi Arabia (or at least what they claim to have).
    It's a very exciting find for the (surprising) country where it was found. It means decades of energy independence. Not only that, but the nation will probably begin to export oil in the next few years, too.
    But it's perhaps even more exciting for investors. You see, one small company controls what is shaping up to be the biggest worldwide oil project to hit in 40 or 50 years. And they won't be the only ones who get rich from this. Far from it.
    Take a look Read More...
  • How China and Saudi Arabia Mean You Should Bet on Higher Oil Prices Energy oil barrel small

    As Money Morning Global Energy Strategist Dr. Kent Moors pointed out not long ago, the sky is not falling on oil prices despite what the doomsayers believe.

    There are two crucial countries that are behind the recent rise in oil prices: China and Saudi Arabia.

    And if these two nations keep on their current path, it will mean one thing...

    Even higher oil prices in 2013. Here's why.

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  • After Nexen's Buyout, How Should You Play Canadian Oil Sands Stocks? Energy oil dollar small

    The purchase of Calgary-based energy company Nexen Inc. (NYSE: NXY) for $15.1 billion by China's CNOOC Ltd. (NYSE ADR: CEO) is the largest overseas purchase ever by the world's second-biggest economic power.

    But it will likely be the last time China, or any other country, takes a big chunk out of Canada's oil sands - the world's third-largest proven reserves of crude oil.

    That's because after Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper approved the Nexen deal in December, he banned further foreign firms' investment in Canada's oil sands and will allow them only under "exceptional" circumstances.

    "The government's concern and discomfort for some time has been that very quickly, a series of large-scale controlling transactions by foreign state-owned companies could rapidly transform this [oil sands] industry from one that is essentially a free market to one that is effectively under control of a foreign government," Harper said in December.

    "Foreign state control of oil sands development has reached the point at which further such foreign state control would not be of net benefit to Canada," he added.

    But foreign government control isn't the real problem facing Canadian oil sands companies.

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  • Two Reasons to Expect Greater Volatility in Oil Prices The upward pressure on prices is building, reflecting higher revisions in forecasted demand. And this week we got two "outside" signals that mean more volatility ahead. Read More...
  • The Doomsayers Are Wrong About Oil Prices According to some prognosticators, the world is going to end. And just before that happens, you are going to lose all your money in the energy market. Why? They rely on three misguided arguments. Here's what they are and why they're wrong. Read More...
  • Why Oil Prices Could Soar 40% by Summer Energy oil dollar

    Oil prices have continued their upward move that began at the end of 2012, gaining over 8% in the past month.

    Now, an oil analyst with Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (NYSE: GS) predicts Brent crude could soar much higher in the next few months.

    Jeff Currie, GS's head of commodity research, said he wouldn't be surprised "if we woke up in summer and oil cost $150" per barrel.

    That would be a 35% gain from Brent's recent price of $111.

    Using the narrowing spread between the Brent price and that of West Texas Intermediate (WTI), at $95, Currie's forecast implies a 40% increase in WTI prices.

    And there are many reasons oil could hit those highs by summer, or even sooner.

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