tech investing 2013

Nasdaq at 4,000: It's Not Tech Pushing the Index Higher

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On Monday, the Nasdaq index topped 4,000 - its highest level in 13 years. But unlike the last time this happened, during the notorious dot-com boom, tech stocks are not the prime driving force. The sector that's been pushing the Nasdaq higher this time around is soaring because the companies in it are making gobs of money - and have the potential to make much more.

This is where you want to be invested in right now..

Will Snapchat Be the Next Social Media IPO?

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Money Morning Capital Wave Strategist Shah Gilani joined Stuart Varney of FOX Business' "Varney & Co." today (Tuesday) to talk about the latest potential social media IPO on the horizon - Snapchat.

Snapchat is a social network that emphasizes privacy; compare it to Facebook (Nasdaq: FB), which touts the benefits of openness. Snapchat finds benefits in keeping conversations and pictures from spilling over to your entire list of contacts.

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4D Printing Potential Makes Me Drool

After more than 30 years in the markets, I've seen all kinds of new technologies that are supposed to change the world. Most are pumped by little-known companies with overly hyped marketing, aggressive underwriters, and little more than vaporware. To say I'm jaded would be an understatement.
But I ran across something recently that positively made my mouth drop.
We already know about 3D printing. It's all the rage right now, because you can buy a printer for a few thousand bucks and cook up whatever your computer can plot.
But 4D printing?
I don't know whether to be terrified or excited as all hell about this.

Probably a little of both...

Is This Man the Next Microsoft CEO?

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There's a shake-up brewing in the business world. Al Mulally, CEO of a rejuvenated, refocused, and red-hot Ford Motor Company, may be heading over to Microsoft, where CEO Steve Ballmer is retreating under fire. Under Mulally, Ford went from the brink of bankruptcy and irrelevance to one of the the most solid performers on Wall Street. Can Mulally do the same thing for Microsoft and move it back into the "Buy" column? Keith Fitz-Gerald joins FOX Business' Neil Cavuto to tackle this question, along with McDonalds' newest strategy and the effect of the looming government shutdown on Wall Street.

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Guys Like This Can Make You Rich

SANTA CLARA, Calif. -- Most investors haven't heard of the man you're about to meet. But they'll certainly wish they had...

He's an executive with the storied Fairchild Semiconductor Int. Inc. (NYSE: FCS) - one of the original Silicon Valley chip makers that played an integral role in the computer revolution.

But don't expect to hear him extolling the virtues of semiconductors.

He's working on something bigger now.

Much bigger.

In fact, now that I've seen his research firsthand, demand for this rapidly growing technology could be twice as big as I predicted a month ago here in Money Morning.

So take notes...

Microsoft: Look at This Chart Before You Decide

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Judging from the 7.28% "Ballmer Bounce" that followed his announcement, the markets love the idea of long-suffering Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer stepping down.

So do a lot of investors who believe now - finally - it's time to buy Microsoft.

But is it?

Can the company bring in a new CEO with vision? Can it finally begin to understand content? And is it willing to jettison employees and products that aren't "worth" what the legacy suggests?

I could write you some long, eloquent essay on the merits of corporate turnarounds.

Instead, I'm going to show you one simple chart...

Why the Best Investments in Tech Right Now Stem from This Industry

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Money Morning Defense and Technology Specialist Michael A. Robinson has been saying how "Big Data" will deliver some of the best investments in technology that we've ever seen...

You see, by 2009, almost every midsized-to-large company in the U.S. economy was storing more than 200 terabytes of data. (A terabyte is about 1 trillion bytes, or 1,000 gigabytes, or 2 times the size of giant retailer Wal-Mart's data warehouse in 1999.)

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