U.S. Dollar

Deflation in 2015? These Four Charts Say Yes

deflation in 2015

Deflation in 2015 seems to be upon us. And while falling prices might seem like a good thing, deflation can wreak havoc on the economy.

In a deflationary period, prices will drop, corporate profits will dry up, wages will shrink, and all of this will reinforce the conditions of recessions.

These four charts show that the U.S. has a real deflation problem now...

This "Financial Mass Destruction" Play Is All Upside

DJIA

While Russia fights for Eastern Ukraine, for now, it's losing the currency war.

Thanks to a perfect storm of low oil prices, economic sanctions put in place in response to the crises in Ukraine, and capital flight, Russia's been forced to capitulate by abandoning its currency peg.

It's all reminiscent of the financial attacks on Iran and its currency.

But fortune favors the bold, and blood's about to start running in the streets of Moscow, providing us an opportunity to capture our share of profits...

Profit from China's Currency Move

profit from China’s currency Unadjusted

China's ambitions for superpower prominence are no secret.

But that requires recognition on the world stage.

Inevitably, that also means a greater role for China's currency, the yuan, in the global finance arena.

There are clear and visible signs that China's currency is on the march to that global position, yet until now they've been underreported.

It's an unstoppable trend, and we can take advantage by taking these critical steps...

How to Profit from a Stronger U.S. Dollar

U.S. Dollar Profit

The Fed plans to wind down its asset purchases this month, but Japan and the United Kingdom are still buying, full swing.

Meanwhile, the European Union is just looking to get started.

And, while the Fed is expected to begin raising rates next year, Europe and Japan recently pushed theirs below zero as deflation appears to be the bigger threat.

That's sent the U.S. dollar into a major run up, with the euro and yen on the losing side.

This adds up to a global currency conflict that's giving us a very rare, very lucrative opportunity right now...

The Rising U.S. Dollar Index Will Nail Multinationals – So Do This Now

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Multinational stocks have started to feel some negative ripple effects of the rising U.S. dollar index.

While a rising U.S. dollar index can have benefits, companies with a lot of global business face reduced sales and profits as their goods grow more expensive. For U.S. companies with substantial overseas sales, this means an extended period of pain.

Here are the companies investors need to watch, and the best strategy for dealing with this situation…

Will a Rising U.S. Dollar Keep Climbing?

rising U.S. dollar

The rising U.S. dollar has climbed to a four-year high - but will it continue?

Appearing on the CNBC program "Street Signs" this morning (Wednesday), Fitz-Gerald explained that wobbly economies in places like Japan and Europe will force central banks elsewhere to further weaken their currencies with U.S. Federal Reserve-style easing programs

In this video, Fitz-Gerald takes a detailed look at the rising U.S. dollar and what it means...

Read More…

Stay Ahead of This (Massive) Currency Shift

China's political and economic presence surges daily. Lockstep with that surge is the growing significance of its currency.

Along with China's emergence as the world's second-largest economy, its yuan recently displaced the euro and became the second-most used currency for international trade.

Chinese leaders are intent on internationalizing their currency by growing its acceptance, perhaps even challenging the U.S. dollar as the new reserve currency, a trend I've highlighted here before.

To reach that goal, new yuan trading centers are being established.

But the location of the next major trading hub is almost certainly not where you'd expect.

And the implications will redefine the power centers of global commerce... Full Story

Don't Fear China and Japan Owning More U.S. Debt

Alibaba buys Yahoo

The U.S. Treasury Department said today (Thursday) that total foreign holdings of U.S. debt rose 1.1% in November to $5.72 trillion, putting foreign holdings 0.1% below the all-time high of $5.76 trillion it reached in March 2013.

In particular, China's holdings reached record levels, increasing 0.9% to $1.32 billion, and so did Japan, which boosted its holdings by 1% to $1.19 trillion. The two countries are the largest and second-largest foreign buyers of Treasury debt, respectively.

To watch the video, click here...

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