Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) Stock: CEO Hastings, Icahn Make Good Points…

Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) stock had a very short-lived boost from Monday's earnings report.

The earnings report showed great news for the company – Netflix reported it ended Q3 with 29.3 million paid domestic users. The video streaming giant added 1.3 million U.S. customers in the third quarter and is on track to surpass Time Warner's HBO in paying viewers.

HBO had 28.96 million U.S. subscribers as of June 30, according to the latest data available, and CBS Corp's Showtime had roughly 23 million.

Netflix has benefited from the growing trend of households canceling cable TV subscriptions. It has expanded its library of titles by producing and funding original programs. Its "Orange Is the New Black" and "House of Cards" have garnered a great deal of social media chatter and critical acclaim. In fact, Netflix made history by being the first non-TV network to win an award at the 2013 Emmys for "Cards."


The news pushed NFLX stock about 10% higher in after-hours trading Monday. It hit a record high Tuesday of $389.16 before falling 9.15% to $322.52.

Profit-taking nailed the stock, which was up only about 1% by Wednesday at 2 p.m.

And this is exactly what Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Reed Hastings feared would happen when he warned of "investor euphoria."

NFLX and Investor Euphoria

As of Tuesday morning, Netflix stock had soared 440% in the past year, and 275% year-to-date.

CEO Hastings said in the investor conference call Monday night that while he was happy with his company's performance, there was more than that behind the stock's move.

"We have a sense of momentum driving the stock price," Hastings said on a conference call. "There's not a lot we can do about it."

Hastings likened the current investor frenzy to 2003, when the Los Gatos, Calif., company was the highest-performing stock traded on the Nasdaq.

He wrote in a note to shareholders that Netflix will focus on growing subscriber base and is doing its best to ignore the stock's volatility.

Wedbush Securities Analyst Michael Pachter said the stock's soaring price indicates investors are not concerned about the gap between net income and cash flow. The gap, $85 million for the first nine months of 2013, is the result of Netflix's steep investment in producing original content.

"That suggests to me that their earnings growth will be a lot less dramatic than the share price suggests," Pachter told USA Today.

One investor who was ready to pull out of NFLX stock: Carl Icahn.

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  1. H. Craig Bradley | October 24, 2013


    Remember Apple's big run in 2012? Momentum investors piled-on, and then after peaking for two weeks in Sept. 2012, they piled-out just as fast and the stock dived until April 2013. Stocks that do that are not good long term investments not only because of volatility, but because once a stock becomes expensive, anything can happen in a high liquidity market like we currently have. Fundamentals don't matter so much at this time in the cycle. Its whatever looks best or sounds best, or is the most popular stock that goes up the most often times.

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