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This Patent Portfolio "Dream Team" Just Got Even Better

When we recommended micro-cap tech play eOn Communications Corp. (NasdaqCM: EONC) last month, we told you to expect a pretty wild ride.

And that’s just what we’ve seen…

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Global Investing Archives - Page 5 of 36 - Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From- Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

  • Tech-Hungry Investors Take the Bait With Overvalued Pandora IPO

    Internet radio company Pandora Media Inc. (NYSE: P) raised $234.9 million in its initial public offering (IPO) Tuesday, luring investors who were looking to get in on this year's batch of Internet stocks.

    The Oakland, CA-based company sold 14.7 million shares at $16 each, up from $9 when the company first announced its IPO. Pandora shares jumped more than 40% as trading started yesterday (Wednesday), but closed only 8.9% higher at $17.42.

    While many analysts like Pandora's long-term outlook, they say the company's financials don't explain its $2.6 billion valuation.

  • Four Middle East Investments That Come with Little Risk and Big Potential

    As I mentioned yesterday (Thursday) in Part One of this story about Middle East investments, instability makes investing in this tumultuous region fairly tricky. But that doesn't mean you ought to avoid it entirely.

    After all, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) said in its World Economic Outlook that the region's economy would expand at a 5.1% pace in 2011, outpacing the United States and Europe.

    And contrary to the perception of many Westerners, that growth projection isn't based primarily on the price outlook for oil, which has trended higher for most of the past year. Rather, it's keyed to everything from construction and new-business development to banking, tourism and even Internet gaming.

  • Investing in the Middle East: The Best Plays to Make

    Periodic eruptions of violence and instability make investing in the Middle East fairly tricky. But that doesn't mean you ought to avoid the region entirely.

    Indeed, investing in the Middle East can be extremely profitable, as the region currently is one of the world's bright spots for economic growth.

    The International Monetary Fund's (IMF) said in its World Economic Outlook that the region's economy would expand by 5.1% clip in 2011. That's well above the 1.5% pace projected for Europe and Japan and the 2.3% rate forecast for the United States.

    And contrary to the perception of many Westerners, that growth projection isn't based primarily on the price outlook for oil, which has trended higher for most of the past year. Rather, it's keyed to everything from construction and new-business development to banking, tourism and even Internet gaming.

    So let's take an in-depth look at each sector, as well as some specific companies to invest in.

  • How to Profit From a Non-U.S. Investing Strategy

    After reading columnist Martin Hutchinson's latest report on the Greek debt crisis last week, one Money Morning reader posed an excellent question: Given the crises already afflicting the markets in Europe and Japan – and the clearly darkening outlook for the U.S. economy – is it possible to craft a "non-U.S. investing strategy" of some type?

    The answer, surprisingly enough, is "yes." You can put together an investment plan that largely avoids U.S.-related holdings – in essence, a non-U.S. investing strategy – and you can put it to work.

    But before you can do that, you must fully understand the current challenges at hand.

  • How to Turn a Tidal Wave of Profit From the Global Shipping Industry

    The shipping industry plays an indispensable role in connecting consumers with their most cherished goods. But many investors unfamiliar with its inner-workings underestimate its potential as a massive profit generator.

    Meanwhile, investors who are aware of its importance, and can track the volatile ups and downs of the companies that provide shipping services, frequently score big gains from its oft-repeating profit opportunities.

    To get a quick idea of the enormity of worldwide shipping activity, you need only look at the U.S. trade numbers.

  • Global Commodity Prices: Soaring Worldwide Population Growth and a Can't-Miss Profit Play

    If you read the newly released United Nations report on global population trends, you can reach only one conclusion about the long-term outlook for global commodity prices.

    They're going higher.

    Much higher.

    In its report, "2010 Revision of World Population Prospects," published May 3, the UN now estimates that the global population will reach 9.3 billion in 2050, which is an increase of 150 million from the 9.15 billion it projected in its 2008 forecast.

    Nor is that the only revision the UN made to its 2008 forecast. Instead of peaking in 2070, as it had previously predicted, the UN now says the world population won't peak until after 2100, when it will reach 10.1 billion – 44% higher than it is today.

    The key takeaway: Given this expectation for worldwide population growth, it's clear that the rise in global resources prices we've seen since 2002 is for real, and is likely to continue for the long term.

    The effect on global commodity prices will be clear – and dramatic. Oil prices, metals prices and – above all – food prices are likely to be much higher in 2050 (in terms of that era's overall purchasing power) than they are today.

    For insights on four population-growth profit plays, please read on…

  • Investing in India: First Comes the Pain, Then Come the Gains

    As investments go, India has really great long-term prospects. No doubt about it.

    Indeed, India has enjoyed very decent growth rates for the last decade, pulling many of its people out of poverty in the process.

    But investing in India can be tricky.

    Allow me to show you why.

    For our forecast for the India stock market, please read on…

  • Canada: Investing in the World's Safest Economy Can Put Profits in Your Pocket

    When a March 25 "no-confidence" vote toppled the government of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, it also set the stage for a new general election.

    This May 2 election will be Canada's third in five years and fourth in seven years. In light of the civil unrest in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region – not to mention the financial problems that continue to plague Europe – it would be understandable if global investors added Canada to the "do not invest" list.Money Morning Quarterly Report

    But don't make that mistake: Our neighbor to the north remains one of the most stable big-market profit plays on the planet today.

    Some investors even refer to it as the "world's safest economy." And with good reason.

    For four ways to profit from the world's "safest economy," please read on…

  • Investing in Steel: Nine Ways to Strengthen Your Portfolio

    Global steel producers were prolific in 2010, with worldwide output reaching a record 1,414 million metric tons (mmt). According to the World Steel Association (WSA), that represented an average production increase of more than 15% from 2009, when the poor global economy had pushed steel demand down to levels not seen since before the turn of the century.

    And, based on recent economic and industry forecasts, both production and demand are expected to continue rising for all of 2011 – which bodes well for investors looking to turn hard metals into solid profits.

    The WSA forecasts finished steel consumption in 2011 will rise 5.3% to nearly 1,340 mmt – in spite of the fact that steel prices have reached near-record levels in recent months, climbing in January to more than $800 per ton of hot-rolled coil steel, the industry's base product unit.

  • Japan Disaster Update: Beware of Global Insurance Stocks

    The catastrophe-modeling company AIR Worldwide Corp. has estimated that insurance company losses from the Japanese earthquake and tsunami could reach $35 billion.

    That has insurance analysts feeling bullish about insurance stocks: In their view, losses are good because it enables the insurers to ratchet up their premiums.

    Personally, I don't see it that way. While I like life-insurance and domestic-insurance companies as investments for ordinary investors, I think the big-ticket insurance market is too opaque, too insider dominated, and much too unlikely to deliver decent returns to its outside shareholders.

    In short, here in the aftermath of the deadly Japan disaster, investors need to beware of global insurance stocks.

    To understand the troubles at hand, please read on…