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Wednesday's "Earnings Beat" Makes This The Perfect "Bad-Market" Tech Stock

In last week’s Private Briefing report Our Experts Show You the Stocks to Pick in a ‘Stock-Picker’s Market’,” Money Map Press Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald identified SanDisk Corp.(NasdaqGS: SNDK) as one of three stocks to buy in the face of the stock market sell-off.

And now we see why…

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Global Markets Archives - Page 6 of 55 - Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From- Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

  • French Internet Tax Should Have U.S. Web Giants Very Worried

    A proposed French Internet tax is just the latest sign of an increasing desire among the major European Union economies to do more to force the big U.S. tech companies to pay their "fair share" of taxes.

    The French Internet tax, an option proposed in a 150-page report released last week, would attempt to tax the collection of personal data. It's directed at such U.S. tech titans as Google Inc. (Nasdaq: GOOG), Amazon.com Inc. (Nasdaq: AMZN), Facebook Inc. (NYSE: FB) and Apple Inc. (Nasdaq: AAPL).

    All four companies collect massive amounts of personal data. Google collects information via its free search engine; Facebook, through the activities of users on its social network. Amazon and Apple collect credit card data and customer habits via their retail operations.

    "We want to work to ensure that Europe is not a tax haven for a certain number of Internet giants," France's digital economy minister, Fleur Pellerin, told reporters in Paris last Friday.

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Weak French Economy Threatens Anxious Eurozone

    Fears that the socialist policies of French President François Hollande would make a weak French economy worse appear now to have been well-founded.

    France announced Thursday that growth for the third quarter was a mere 0.2%. The French economy shrank 0.1% in the previous quarter, and most economists expect that contraction to resume in the current quarter.

    Meanwhile, unemployment has risen to 10.2%, its highest level in 13 years.

    Since Hollande won the French presidential elections in May, he has increased the minimum wage, lowered the retirement age for some workers (which his predecessor has just raised in an attempt to reduce government costs), created tens of thousands of education jobs and, of course, announced big tax increases.

    But instead of reviving the weak French economy as Hollande promised, all indications are that his policies are making a French recession in 2013 more likely.

    "The third quarter is probably the result of a temporary rebound at the European level," Michel Martinez, an economist at Societe Generale in Paris told Bloomberg News. He added that business sentiment indicates France's "economy is heading to a moderate recession or at best remaining flat."

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  • What Hope Means in Japan These Days

    [Kyoto] – Frustrated by a system that has trapped them in decades of low to no growth, an entirely new generation of Japanese may be working with the most precious of all resources – hope.

    They're taking matters into their own hands and going around the traditional Japanese way of doing things.

    That's good.

    The so-called "Lost Decade" is now entering its 3rd lost decade following 8-10 separate bailout failures, depending on how you count the various initiatives over the years.

    Growth remains a paralyzed version of its former self with the nation's GDP roughly the size it was in 1990.

    Worse, many Japanese companies like Panasonic and Sony, once at the vanguard of innovation, now find themselves scrambling to keep up with clever rivals who have taken the lead and who now threaten to push them out of the global industries they once dominated for good.

    Combined public, private and corporate debt now approaches 500% of GDP.

    Roughly 35% of the working population here remains trapped in arubaito, or part- time work. T hat's a far cry from the vision of lifetime employment that once dominated the corporate landscape.

    Some, like Tadashi Yanai, who founded and heads the Japanese brand Uniqlo (pronounced yu-ni-klo), are deemed "young thinkers" bent on change through the sheer force of will and the economic means to bring it about. Yanai is actually 63 years old.

    Speaking Truth to Power

    Others are truly young, like Osaka's controversial mayor, Toru Hashimoto. At 43, he's as frank as they come in the staid world of Japanese politics where change is nearly impossible to come by.

    To give you an example of what I am talking about, consider Hashimoto's recent observation that the Japanese political system is "crap." Not "difficult," not "worth consideration," not deserving of "careful thought," as would be the traditional ways the hyper- polite Japanese have expressed their opinions — but "crap" as in the four- letter variety.

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  • China's Pyramid of Power

    China celebrated another achievement last week, as Mo Yan became the first Chinese citizen to win a Nobel Prize for literature.

    The selection of Mo was praised by a Chinese nationalist tabloid as a sign that mainstream China could "no longer be refused by the West for long."

    Mo grew up in Shandong province in northeastern China, and during the Cultural Revolution, he left school to work in the fields, finishing his education in the army, according to The Guardian. The author draws upon his rural upbringing in his novels, mixing historical perspective with mythical elements.

    His real name is Guan Moye, but he chose "Mo Yan" as a pen name meaning "don't speak," to reflect the culture in which he grew up.

    The new Nobel laureate is of the same generation as the new leaders set to take over the Politburo Standing Committee next month after the convening of the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China.

    This group of men (and one female contender) are "old enough to remember the suffering of the Cultural Revolution, but also young enough to fully experience how China has grown through Deng [Xiaoping]'s opening of the economy to market forces," says CLSA China Strategy research.

    They've seen vast political reforms take place, transforming China "from a country ruled by the contradictory personal whims of Mao to one ruled through institutions and rules," says William H. Overholt in The Washington Quarterly.

    During these decades, "freedoms blossomed, affecting everything from clothing to haircuts to job or marital choices to social and political speech," says Overholt.

    As a result of these policies, they've been able to witness China's incredible growth, with GDP averaging 10 percent per year and more than 500 million people moving out of poverty over the past 30 years.

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  • Iran's Currency Collapse Has All the Markings of a Full-Blown Crisis

    Matters are beginning to come to a head in Iran.

    So far, the impact of Western sanctions – an EU embargo of oil purchases, European and U.S. restrictions on Tehran's access to international banking, and a new move to intensify the trading restrictions even further – have had a devastating impact.

    Iran's currency, the rial, has collapsed.

    Riots have begun. Its government has rapidly lost its authority. And the Iranian economy is unraveling.

    This has all the markings of a full-blown crisis.

    It will have an uncertain impact on the region and the wider oil market. This could get very unpredictable and very nasty.

    Let me explain…

    Sanctions Paralyze Iran's Economy

    Indications are emerging from several quarters that the current sanctions regime has dealt a major blow to the Iranian currency. The developments are prompting foreign initiatives to paralyze the regime in Tehran.

    "The current perception is that the sanctions may have to be increased before Tehran will show clear signs of relenting," a source in the EU Energy Commissioner's office told me on October 6.

    Still, it remains too early to determine how far EU members are prepared to go in strengthening anti-trade restrictions.

    Nonetheless, several policy sources in Brussels, London, and Paris, confirmed last week that a rising consensus believes something additional is warranted.

    A complete EU embargo of Iranian oil imports took effect on July 1. That action had widely been expected to put upward pressure on Brent prices in London. While some of that pressure has materialized, continuing demand concerns from the ongoing credit crisis and sluggish employment data have dampened the impact.

    Still, a widening of the rift with Iran, coupled with the deteriorating situation on the Syrian-Turkish border, is certain to bring the problem to center stage.

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  • The Consensus in Europe is Simple, Oil Prices are Headed Higher

    My latest trip to London may have centered on the briefings I gave on Iranian oil sanctions, but I also did a number of media appearances.

    As I have mentioned before, questions from European interviewers are generally more knowledgeable and to the point than in the states. This may be because places like London are much closer to the events directly affecting oil prices.

    However, there was a surprising element.

    Nobody - be he/she a commentator, journalist, analyst, or expert – expected a fall in oil prices. The entire market environment in Europe is looking in the other direction.

    In London, my predictions of $130 a barrel for Brent and $115 for WTI (West Texas Intermediate, the benchmark crude traded on the NYMEX) by the end of 2012 were considered on the low side.

    My further suggestion of $150 for Brent and $130 for WTI by the end of 2013 have caused some disagreement in the states, but are par for the course averages for what people are saying over in Europe.

    In fact, the overwhelming consensus in Europe is that oil will rise, absent exogenous economic or financial problems.

    In other words, the price can go down, but such a move would be a result of another bout with credit crises, intra bank problems, or currency weakening.

    In such situations, the lowering of oil prices has nothing to do with oil, or its supply/demand balance, or its trade. Rather, economic constriction results in concerns over short and medium-term demand and those translate into a lower price.

    Left on its own, the consensus over here is simple. Oil goes up.

    Concerns Grow in Europe Over Oil Prices

    Now, unlike in the U.S., the conversation does not then immediately move to prices at the pump.

    Gasoline is less of an issue for the simple reason that a combination of heavy taxation, lowered usage and a far better mass transit system has made driving more of a luxury than in the U.S.

    Paying the equivalent of $7 a gallon tends to have that effect.

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  • The Challenge in the Persian Gulf with Iran Looms Large

    My meetings and media interviews continue here in London. But this morning I want to fill you in on one of the more interesting briefings I have ever held.

    Last night, Marina and I had the distinct pleasure of dining with Khaled Duwaisan, Kuwait's Ambassador to the Court of St. James and the longest-serving foreign emissary in London.

    His Excellency is a very gracious man, well respected by his peers, and, after more than two decades in London, certainly somebody who has seen much come and go in his time.

    Our discussions centered on the situation presented by Iran in the Persian Gulf and the current crisis there.

    Also attending the dinner and long discussion were the ambassadors from every other Gulf Coordination Council nation in the region and the legal representative of the Iranians (who currently have no official diplomatic connection with the United Kingdom).

    Now, as with such sessions, all of the conversations were held under Chatham House rules. That means, while general themes can be discussed, all participants agree not to connect named people with specific positions in commenting on the meeting afterwards.

    This was one of the more memorable sessions I have ever had. It was striking how articulately and passionately the delegates addressed the subject.

    The overwhelming response to my comments could be summarized in two ways: the rejection of a nuclear-armed Iran and a strong opinion that the region must settle its affairs on its own.

    The first conclusion is certainly shared by the West, but the second may well be difficult to achieve in practice. The prospect of Iran with nuclear capability is hardly a matter Washington, or London, or Brussels will allow the region to decide on its own.

    The gathering certainly understood that. These are, after all, seasoned diplomats well-schooled in the protocols and realities of international politics. But they are also experienced in the affairs of a region with the longest and most intricate negotiating traditions on the face of the earth.

    They also have a perspective honed from several thousand years of history, tradition, and conflict. There was present a quality I rarely experience in my international meetings — patience.

    However, one other matter quickly surfaced that was unanimously viewed as a major element in the ongoing conflict. The assembled representatives spoke about it candidly and directly.

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • What to Do When Every Market Is Ponzi Scheme

    LIBOR, Bernie Madoff, MF Global, Peregrine Financial, zero-percent interest rates, the Social Security and Medicare entitlement funds, many state and municipal pension funds, mark-to-model asset values, quote stuffing and high frequency trading (HFT), and debt-based money?

    What do the following have in common?…

    The answer is that every single thing in that list is an example of market rigging, fraud, or both.

    How are we supposed to make decisions in today's rigged and often fraudulent market environment?

    Where should you put your money if you don't know where the risks lie? How does one control risk when control fraud runs rampant?

    Unfortunately, there are no perfect answers to these questions.

    Instead, the task is to recognize what sort of world we happen to live in today and adjust one's actions to the realities as they happen to be.

    The purpose of this report is not to stir up resentment or anger — although those are perfectly valid responses to the abuses we are forced to live with — but to simply acknowledge the landscape as it is so that we can make informed decisions.

    In this report I connect the dots on the fraud, noting both what we already know about and what we'd better prudently suspect is happening but not yet revealed. (If you'd like to jump straight to our conclusions about this Ponzi scheme click here.)

    Swimming Naked

    As Warren Buffet said, "It's only when the tide goes out that you learn who's been swimming naked."

    What he meant was that poorly-run companies can appear healthy during boom times but are later exposed as hollow shells when the economic tide retreats. Naturally it's a lot easier to make money when times are booming, but much more difficult when the economic pie is stagnant or shrinking. The dot-com companies of the late 1990s are the poster children for this phenomenon.

    My corollary to Buffet's naked swimming quote is this: It's only when the pie stops expanding that you find out who's been running a Ponzi scheme.

    The global pie is no longer expanding, and the relentless parade of disquieting economic and financial news can be laid right upon that fact.

    Sure, there are the prosecutable examples, such as Bernie Madoff, but state and municipal pensions and the Social Security entitlement program also fit the definition. So does the practice of expanding public debt at a faster pace than GDP, which many nations, provinces, and states have done for many years running.

    These are all Ponzi schemes in the sense that they require constant growth to remain 'healthy' (or hidden, more accurately) and are therefore mathematically certain to fail. Now that the economic pie is no longer growing like it used to and most likely will not for decades to come (if ever), all of these schemes are rapidly falling apart.

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • How Higher U.S. Food Prices in 2013 Will Starve the Global Economy

    The epic drought – the worst in 56 years – that has wreaked havoc on more than half the United States is setting up 2013 to deliver record-high U.S. food prices that will affect more than just our grocery budgets.

    As the drought continues to kill crops throughout the Midwestern U.S., a region known as the "corn belt" because it produces 40% of the world's crop, the problem reaches farther than the dry U.S.

    Now the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) warns that if countries, including the United States, restrict exports on concerns of higher grain prices, the world could face a kind of food crisis like the one seen five years ago.

    "There is potential for a situation to develop like we had back in 2007/08," Abdolreza Abbassian, FAO's senior economist and grain analysts told Reuters. "There is an expectation that this time around we will not pursue bad polices and intervene in the market by restrictions, and if that doesn't happen we will not see such a serious situation as 2007/08. But if those policies get repeated, anything is possible."

    Abbassian added, "The very strong appreciation of the dollar, and the surge in prices, is basically a double blow which is going to be quite stressful for some of the more fragile countries."

    Related: Higher food prices are just one part of a fascinating but frightening global trend that will restrain our most vital resources, as well as your finances – unless you're prepared.

    Rising Food Prices Stall Economic Recovery

    The FAO Food Price Index jumped 6% in July after three months of declines. Grain markets got a boost from speculation that Black Sea grain producers, particularly in Russia, might levy export restrictions after a drought there walloped crops.

    A study conducted last year by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, based on some 70 years of weather data, found that from heat waves to cold snaps to droughts, weather could cause up to a 1.7% rise or fall each year in the U.S. economy's gross domestic product. In 2011, not counting extreme weather events like tornadoes or hurricanes, the amount was $507 billion.

    Jeff Lazo, one of the study leaders, told USA Today that the findings are significant "especially when GDP is growing a percent or so a year, if that."

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • How Global Growth Fears Are Playing Out in the Stock Market Today

    After a strong start to the week the stock market today is down on fears of a worldwide economic slowdown. Investors are dealing with weak reports from China and more signs that the drought's effect on U.S. crops is not over.

    China, the world's second largest economy, has been a leader of global growth, but is showing more and more signs that its economy is slowing.

    China reported its exports grew just 1% from last July, well below forecasts and much lower than the 11.3% increase in June. Import growth stalled as well, up only 4.7% compared to a year earlier, well below the June growth of 6.3%.

    At home, the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture released a report today projecting an enormous drop in corn production and an ensuing spike in prices.

    In its monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand report, the USDA projected the corn harvest would fall by 2.2 billion bushels, or 22.6 bushels per acre, resulting in a harvest of 123.4 bushels per acre.

    Analysts had anticipated a decline of 20 bushels per acre and a harvest of 126 bushels per acre.
    The 2012-2013 crop yield is now expected to be the worst since the 1995-1996 season and prices are soaring.

    The USDA said it now expects farm prices for corn to reach a record high this season of $7.50 to $8.90 per bushel, sharply higher than its July forecast of $5.40 to $6.40 per bushel.

    The food crisis is affecting consumers across the world as the United Nations released a report on Thursday indicating that world food prices rose 6% in July.