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These 12 Moves Will Save Your (Financial) Life

In a talk earlier this week, I urged you to make 2017 the best year possible.

And I promised to help you along that journey.

Today, I'm keeping that promise.

While it's still early in the year - meaning there is still plenty of time to get yourself in a good groove - here are 12 moves you can make that will help you steer your course to financial stability and even wealth.

Think of it as a "Baker's Dozen" set of strategies that will shape your thinking, help with your planning and secure your future...

We refer to them internally here as our "Downturn Lessons."

Now I'm going to share them with you ...In a talk earlier this week, I urged you to make 2017 the best year possible.

And I promised to help you along that journey.

Today, I'm keeping that promise.

While it's still early in the year - meaning there is still plenty of time to get yourself in a good groove - here are 12 moves you can make that will help you steer your course to financial stability and even wealth.

Think of it as a "Baker's Dozen" set of strategies that will shape your thinking, help with your planning and secure your future...

We refer to them internally here as our "Downturn Lessons."

Now I'm going to share them with you ...

  1. Ted Fraley | January 15, 2017

    Saying to stay in the market to not miss the 10 best days is a very one-sided argument. In actuality you're much better off to miss the ten best days and the 10 worse days than to stay during downturns. The reason for this is because the 10 worse days are much larger then the 10 best days. The same argument holds true for the 60 best and worse days. This false argument has been propagated by brokerage houses since before I started trading 50 years ago. I am far ahead of buy and hold because I got completely out of the market during a few bad times.

  2. Willam Juch | January 17, 2017

    Fraley is right about the math, anyway. If a stock with a strike of $10 goes down 50%, and then recovers 30%, in real terms it has only recovered 15% from the low. Thus 50% of $10 is $5. 30% of $5 is $1.50. The stock climbs back to $6.50 with its "30%" gain. $1.50 is 15% of $10. I see this all the time in social science, btw.

    The next worst Wall Street measurement is "bastard scales." I'll let you figure that one out.

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