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"Chicago Bridge Ain't Falling Down"… Thanks to Warren

Subscriber Edward O. wrote in recently to ask for a follow-up to our June 3 recommendation of Chicago Bridge & Iron NV (NYSE: CBI).

“Chicago Bridge & Iron had been accused of shady accounting practices (by a possible short seller),” Edward writes. “The share price has suffered, and I’d appreciate a follow-up assessment.”

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    Robo-Signing is the Tip of the Iceberg for the Banks

    What may be good news for delinquent credit card holders may also be really bad news for banks.

    It turns out the "robo-signing" of foreclosure affidavits is just the tip of the iceberg.

    In what one judge called "robo-testimony," falsely attested-to statements by bank document custodians have been submitted in courts around the country by banks trying to win judgments against delinquent credit card debtors.

    Apparently, tens of millions of credit cards issued by banks have not been accompanied by good recordkeeping, either.

    Chasing down delinquent borrowers in court requires original credit agreements and accurate payment histories to verify outstanding balances and claims.

    As it turns out, banks aren't providing them - either to the courts or to third-party debt collection companies that buy uncollected debts for pennies on the dollar.

    As a result of these shoddy practices, judgments already granted to banks could be overturned and they could be sued by state attorney generals or pursued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

    The same banks could even be potentially charged by the Justice Department under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Statutes for selling dubiously documented accounts to debt collection companies.

    While some debtors will take comfort in what they read here, investors in banks may want to question how legal issues and regulatory investigations will impact their stocks.

    To continue reading, please click here...


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