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Sharpen Your Pencil – And Put These Three Stocks on Your "Shopping List"

Ask any of our gurus for advice on how to survive a stock-market sell-off – or even a whipsaw period like the one we’re navigating now – and you’ll get a surprising answer.

Keep a shopping list ready, they’ll tell you…

  • Featured Story

    Even the Eurozone Debt Crisis Gets a Vacation …But Not For Long

    The Eurozone debt crisis has taken a late summer vacation. Since it would be very inconvenient for a disaster to erupt while everyone is on holiday, it doesn't.

    That's not to say this rule is infallible. One year, all the decision-makers went on holiday in late July, and came back to find themselves embroiled in World War I.

    What traders and decision makers will find waiting for them when they get home from the beach could be almost as serious. Here's why...

    A Laundry List of Problems

    Greece has done nothing to redeem its position other than prepare an application for more money. Italy's GDP declined by 0.7% in the second quarter, and we are shortly to enter the run-up to the next Italian election.

    What's more, Spain is trying desperately to avoid asking for a bailout, and may just succeed in doing so, but one more hiccup in its recalcitrant provincial governments will push it over the edge.

    Then there's Portugal, which has entered a deep recession, and is showing signs of missing its budget targets again.

    And that laundry list of potential problems doesn't include the biggest one of them all.

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  • eurozone bailout

  • Eurozone Debt Crisis Won't Be Fixed by "Bailout Lite" The market red ink this morning (Monday) around the globe is the result of a usual suspect - Spain.

    These days, if someone even sneezes in Madrid, Barcelona, or Crdoba (one of my favorite places, actually), investors go into intensive care all over the world.

    This new Spanish influenza has been wiping out paper value from one end of Europe to the other. This morning came word that many of the regions in the country will need help. Attention is now directed from focused support for banks to wider calls for a sovereign bailout.

    And that is where the whole matter can turn nasty. Word is that we should now expect some Italian cities to be requesting money in the near future. Seems California and Pennsylvania are not the only locations where cities can go bankrupt.

    The accord reached at the end of June by the Council of Europe (the EU member heads of government) to bail out Spanish banks is already derisively referred to as "bailout lite." As the beer commercials attest, this is going to be "less filling."

    Unfortunately, it is the heavier version that Europe now needs.

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  • Spain Squeezed by Eurozone Bailout Deal In attempts to ease its mushrooming financial pains, Spain unveiled new austerity measures today (Wednesday) that aim to reduce 65 billion euros ($80 billion) from the public deficit by 2014.

    The move is part of an agreement Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy made when he accepted a Eurozone bailout for his country's ailing banking system. Rajoy surrendered to mounting pressure to at least make an effort to avoid a full state bailout.

    "We have very little room to choose. I pledged to cut taxes and now I'm raising them. But the circumstances have changed and I have to accept them," Rajoy told the national parliament.

    As protests erupted from anti-austerity crowds that gathered in Madrid, Rajoy explained plans to roll back social welfare protections and immediately raise taxes so that he could secure emergency aid and placate jittery investors.

    Rajoy announced higher taxes and cuts to unemployment benefits, union pay, and civil service perks.

    Amid boos and heckling, Rajoy told the parliament, "These measures are not pleasant, but they are necessary. Our public spending exceeds our income by tens of billion euros."

    The moves highlight how Rajoy and Spain are at the mercy of the EU"s tough bailout provisions if the government hopes to get any more money for its struggling banks.

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  • The Eurozone Bailout: Prepare for What's Next Q: What will happen in Europe?

    Greece chickens out. The G20 has its hands out and wants to have Germany's standard of living. Germany should leave the EU and preserve its economy. There is no reason it should sacrifice itself to pay for the malfeasance and incompetence of everybody else.

    Politicians will kick the can down the road while hoping rumors of future action will carry the day.

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  • Does the Eurozone Have Its Own Lehman Bros? Does the Eurozone have its own American International Group Inc. (NYSE: AIG), or worse, its own Lehman Bros. when it comes to Greece?

    I believe it does.

    Why else would the European Union have bent over backwards to "save" a member nation that: A) Accounts for 2.01% of the EU by trade volume; and B) Would essentially be like letting Montana go out of business - no offense to Montanans or Montana!

    More to the point, if things really were under control, why would European Central Bank President Jean-Claude Trichet say that risk signals for financial stability in the euro area are flashing "red" as he did following a meeting of the European Systemic Risk Board in Frankfurt?

    The short answer: Because he knows what the European banks are desperately trying to hide from the rest of the world - that there are still enormous risks and they're even more concentrated now than they were in 2008 at the start of the financial crisis.

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