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The Cybersecurity Play That Doubled Once – Will Double Again

Not long ago, a relative of mine was the victim of identity theft. And I have to tell you that I really felt for the entire family.

The thief ran up nearly $20,000 in charges, opened new accounts and tried to open others.

And I can tell you that the frustrations over the losses (most of which ended up being covered) were dwarfed by the helplessness that came whenever new charges showed up – and the worry that was spawned by never finding out how the whole mess started.

As we watch the headlines about data breaches and cybercrime – and watch as the violations move closer and closer to home – those worries only escalate.

  • Featured Story

    January Jobs Report: Even the Cooked Numbers Are Bad

    Jobs Report-Employment listing

    The January jobs report is another sign of how weak our economic recovery is - and it's not even taking into account all of the unemployed.

    Friday, the Labor Department reported employers added 113,000 jobs last month. The unemployment rate ticked down to 6.6% from 6.7% in January, a rate not seen in five years.

    But we know that number doesn't tell the full story...

    The decline in the unemployment rate is due to an ongoing trend: discouraged workers exiting the labor force.

    The actual unemployment rate, the U-6 rate, which includes "marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons," remains at an unhealthy 12.7%.


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  • January jobs report

  • April Employment Report Begins to Show the Signs of the "Obamacare Effect" Chart down small

    Economists breathed a sigh of relief when the Labor Department reported a better than expected April employment report on Friday, but the details show cracks still remain.

    Many of the job gains proved to be in lower paying fields and the average number of hours worked dipped.

    In fact, April's report revealed the average workweek for private sector employees declined 0.2 hour to 34.4 hours.

    The data also suggests The Affordable Health Care Act, aka Obamacare, is already having an impact on hiring since job growth has slowed most significantly among businesses with 50-499 employees.

    This could be the reason why...

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  • January 2013 Jobs Report: 4 Reasons Unemployment Will Stay High OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    The U.S. Labor Department released the January 2013 jobs report Friday, showing the unemployment rate inched upward from 7.8% to 7.9%.

    Employers added 157,000 jobs in January, short estimates of 168,000, which would have kept the unemployment rate stable.

    The jobs report included some good news: Revisions to last year's data, customary in January, show the U.S. added 335,000 more jobs than initially reported in 2012, bringing the monthly average for jobs gained to 181,000 from the 153,000 initially reported.

    Employment gains for November and December were revised higher by a total of 127,000.

    Contributing most to January payroll increases were the retail, construction and healthcare sectors. The government continued to shed workers, a trend that began four years ago.

    But the employment outlook remains bleak. Joblessness has proved persistent, with the unemployment rate stuck above an unhealthy 7% for more than four years.

    "The good news is that January's employment gains, coupled with large revisions to the prior months, may translate into more consumer spending power. The bad news is that unemployment remains stubbornly high," said Kathy Bostjanic, director of macroeconomics analysis at the Conference Board.

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  • Why the January 2013 U.S. Jobs Report May Surprise You

    The U.S. employment picture is expected to show continued signs of improvement when the Labor Department releases January's U.S. jobs report Friday morning.

    Projections are for nonfarm payrolls to have gained 168,000 employees during the first month of 2013.

    While a decent number, the tally won't be enough to budge the nation's 7.8% unemployment rate.

    Forecasts from 90 economists polled by Thomson Reuters range from a 75,000 gain on the low end to a 200,000 gain.

    In December, the number was a surprisingly robust 155,000. Over the past two years, the average has been 153,000 per month.

    "We started the year on a pretty solid footing. I think the report is going to be a little bit better than what most people think," Steve Blitz, chief economist at ITG Investment Research, told the International Business Times.

    But a number of factors could skew data in the U.S. jobs report. Here's what you should watch for.

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