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If You Want to Double Your Money, Don't Touch That Dial

Just about this time last year, we made two bold predictions.

In the first, we told you to expect a big shift from the current high-definition-standard (HD) televisions to next-generation UHDTVs (ultra-high-definition televisions).

In the second, we told you there were immediate opportunities to cash in…

  • home energy independence

  • The Path to Energy Independence is More Rocky Than It Seems You might have seen yesterday's headline in the Wall Street Journal: "U.S. Redraws World Oil Map."

    As the article explains, U.S. oil production is now on pace to surpass Saudi Arabia by 2020. This would make the United States world's largest oil producer. We're already the second-largest natural gas producer, according to 2010 EIA estimates.

    It's all thanks to the U.S. shale boom that has unlocked billions of barrels of oil and trillions of feet of natural gas from the Appalachian Mountains to the Pacific Coast, from the Bakken in North Dakota to the shale fields of southern Texas.

    But all of this fracking has caused some serious economic and environmental problems.

    And while I greatly advocate increased drilling and domestic production, we still must address a wide-range of problems now plaguing the shale oil and gas sectors.

    After all - with apologies to Voltaire and Spiderman - with such great fortune comes greater responsibility.

    That's why I am in the third day of what has become a very interesting conference here in Pittsburgh. It was convened to set the agenda moving forward to deal with the almost invisible aspects of shale oil and gas drilling.

    In fact, for the first time, the conference's primary focus will be on the negatives caused by the drilling.

    We also have questions surrounding the amount of water required to frack these formations (the process needs a lot of water to break open rock and release hydrocarbons), as well as the ongoing public health fears from the chemicals used.

    Now, we are seeing parallel economic problems as well.

    In the Marcellus basin, researchers are now recording some of these shortcomings and placing them in four basic categories.

    The real concern is that these four problems - in infrastructure, labor, local inflation, and the environment - will remain well after the drilling (and the revenue) has moved on.

    So before you decide to declare "energy independence", take a look at some of the downside that may come along with it.

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  • The Truth About $6 Gas, $200 Oil and the Quest for Energy Independence No one needs to tell the average American about the impact of oil and gas prices. If they don't feel it in their wallets every day, they hear about it on the news every night.

    But surprisingly, amid all the rhetoric, there have been no real answers to some of the key questions driving the energy debate... until now.

    Is President Obama truly responsible for high gas prices, and can his opponents really bring them back down?

    What role has Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's loose monetary policy played in soaring energy costs?

    Is more domestic drilling the answer?

    Renowned energy expert Dr. Kent Moors answers all of these questions - and more - below.

    Dr. Moors, an adviser to six of the world's top 10 oil companies and a consultant to governments around the world, also talks about the effect political turmoil in the Middle East could have on energy prices in the immediate term and how North America will gain energy independence in 15-20 years.

    Here's what else Moors - a bona-fide energy expert - had to say...

    Dr. Moors on Gas Prices

    Can a U.S. President actually impact gas prices- at least enough to get gasoline back to $2.50 a gallon? Or is this just talk? I don't know whom to believe anymore...

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