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This Says Our Favorite Biotech Is Off to the Races

Shares of a promising biotech we recommended back in February 2013 – jumped as much as 27% to a three-month high of $14.20 yesterday after the company said a new cancer drug met its main goal in a midstage clinical trial.

Its shares backtracked a bit as the day progressed but still closed 17.6% higher for the session. These shares have advanced 361% since we first told you about them. The stock has generated a peak gain of 456%, making it one of the 31 recommendations we’ve made to you that have doubled or better since we launched Private Briefing in August 2011. (More on that later…)

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    Debt Ceiling News Today: What the "Clean" Deal Means for the U.S. Economy

    John_Boehner

    Debt ceiling news 2014: The House of Representative passed a one-year extension to the United States' debt limit on Tuesday evening.

    Sen. Majority Leader Harry M. Reid (D-NV) has already said he would pass the bill, although Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) may demand a 60-vote threshold on the deal. With U.S. President Barack Obama's signature, the nation would no longer face the threat of defaulting on its debt of $17.2 trillion within the next couple of months.

    The deal passed by a narrow vote, 221 to 201, with just 28 Republicans supporting a "clean" extension of the country's borrowing power.


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  • Four Things the Debt Ceiling Deal Doesn't Fix Time Bomb Everyone in the Capitol is patting themselves on the back and glad-handing for the news media, rattling on about “fighting the good fight.” Sure, we’ve avoided default… for just 112 more days. Most of us won’t even pay four phone bills by the time the “crisis” gets brewing again. As ridiculous as that fact is, it gets worse. You see, the “Great Band-Aid Treaty” doesn’t actually do anything to address the fundamental challenges facing our economy right now. Here are the four biggest issues that Congress ducked out on...
  • Debt Ceiling Deal Doesn't Fix This Larger Global Issue with United States Uncle Sam debt

    Senate leaders finally hammered out a debt ceiling deal today (Wednesday) that avoided a looming potential debt default. It also reopened the government that has been shut down for more than two weeks.

    Investors cheered the news and sent stocks up 205 points, or 1.36%, today.

    While a deal solves short-term problems, it's not doing much to help the long-term nightmare.

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  • A Debt Ceiling Deal May Not Stop a Fitch Downgrade Thumbs down small So we got a deal to raise the debt ceiling, at least until February. But when Fitch warned it might downgrade the U.S. credit rating, it wasn't just talking about the likelihood of the U.S. defaulting on its debt. A Fitch downgrade is not only still possible - it's probable. Here's why it could happen and what it would mean...
  • Why the Government Shutdown Is Good for Investors cheer Q As of midnight Monday, the government shutdown is upon us. But this is only the first of several budget-battle flashpoints coming over the next few months that will thrash the markets. And despite the angst it will bring, every Washington screwup has a silver lining for investors who know how to play it... Read more...
  • Debt Ceiling Bill Nothing More Than a Band-Aid

    We have a short-term debt ceiling fix - with emphasis on short term.

    U.S. President Barack Obama Monday night signed into law a bill suspending the debt ceiling, a move that allows the government to avoid default-at least until August when Congress will again have to act to prevent such a scenario.

    The new law lifts the current debt limit through May 18, allowing the federal government to continuing borrowing to pay its bills until then.

    But Congress does have more leeway than the May 18 deadline. The Treasury can use "extraordinary measures" to access funds, which will give it until August before the risk of default comes up again.

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  • The Debt Ceiling 2013: How We Got Here, What Could Happen

    A new twist to investing and financial planning is averting travesties that the government itself created; first it was the fiscal cliff, now it's the debt ceiling 2013.

    The debt ceiling is a part of the way government has to go about doing its business.

    However, both sides of Washington have come to use the full faith and credit of the United States of America as a bargaining chip - and the consequences are huge.

    But it wasn't always like this.

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  • Are Steep U.S. Spending Cuts Inevitable? Credit card cutting small

    U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI), the chairman of the House Budget Committee, is adamant Republicans will resist any further tax increases - a staunch GOP stance that makes steep spending cuts almost certain.

    Ryan, the 2012 vice president nominee, told NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday that the $1.2 trillion worth of automatic spending cuts will take effect because "Democrats have opposed our efforts to replace those cuts with others."

    In the NBC interview, Ryan took aim at President Barack Obama.

    "I don't think that the president actually thinks we have a fiscal crisis," Ryan said. "He's been reportedly saying to our leaders that we don't have a spending problem, we have a healthcare problem. That leads me to conclude that he just thinks we ought to have more government-run healthcare and rationing."

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  • Will the Debt Ceiling be Good for Gold and Silver?

    Investors preparing for Washington's budget battle need to know: Will the debt ceiling be good for gold and silver?

    Thanks to recent legislation passed in the U.S. House of Representatives Wednesday, the debt ceiling could be extended until May 19. The bill now moves onto the Senate where it is expected to get the green light, then should be signed quickly by U.S. President Barack Obama.

    That gives investors time to prepare for what any budget decision - or indecision - out of Washington will do for their investments.

    While the bill leaves the government without a long-term budget strategy, investors ought to have a plan in place.

    One thing they can plan on is higher silver and gold, and here's why.

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  • Debt Ceiling Bill Intensifies Budget Pressure on Congress

    The debt-ceiling showdown took center stage on Capitol Hill today (Wednesday) as a crucial vote on a Republican bill gave the Treasury the green light to borrow a fresh stash of cash until May 19.

    The Republican-controlled House passed the bill by a 284-144 margin.

    It now moves on to the Senate, where it is expected to pass quickly without any changes.

    Senate Democrats are expected to back the plan even though they have been hesitant to support any short-term debt ceiling fix, maintaining it creates additional uncertainty for businesses and families.

    "I'm very glad that (House Republicans) are going to send us a clean debt-ceiling bill," said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-NV.

    The measure would go from the Senate to U.S. President Barack Obama, who has repeatedly said he will not wrangle over the debt ceiling and will sign the bill when it reaches his desk.

    Pleased with the results, the White House added a "but," saying it would have liked a longer- term solution.

    While the legislation looked extremely likely to make it to the Oval Office, there is still a chance it could get tangled up in Congress, given a controversial provision in the bill.

    The legislation includes a divisive rider aimed at coercing Senate Democrats to ink a long-term budget deal. The "no budget- no pay" provision would withhold pay for members of Congress until a sustainable deal is agreed upon.

    "It's not a slam dunk. But the main thing is that the Republicans will cave on the debt ceiling. So we're now just arguing over the details," Greg Valliere, chief political strategist for Potomac Research Group, told CNN Money ahead of the voting.

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  • Debt Ceiling Bill Includes Controversial "No Pay" Plan

    Republicans will vote tomorrow (Wednesday) on a debt ceiling bill that will give Congress nearly four months to make some major budget decisions - or risk losing out on pay.

    The bill aims "to ensure complete and timely payment of the obligations of the United States Government until May 19, 2013," according to a release Monday from the House Rules Committee. Exactly how much the $16.4 trillion debt ceiling will be lifted hasn't been discussed.

    In a significant shift in GOP strategy, the legislation does not include specific spending cuts, like previously when Republicans have requested dollar-for-dollar cuts to match the debt ceiling increase.

    What it could include is a requirement for both the House and Senate to pass a budget by as early as April 15 or have Congress members' salaries held in escrow until one is passed - what the GOP has coined a "no budget, no pay" rule.

    "[I]f the Senate of House fails to pass a budget in that time, members of Congress will not be paid by the American people for failing to do their job. No budget, no pay," House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-VA, said last week.

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  • The Debt Ceiling Isn't What Worries Warren Buffett

    Investment guru Warren Buffett isn't sweating the debt ceiling as much as he is some of the country's other issues.

    Buffett this weekend said the $16.4 trillion in debt the country has collected is not the number on which everyone should be focused.

    "It is not a good thing to have it going up in relation to GDP, that should be stabilized, but the debt itself is not a problem," the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.A) told CBS' "Sunday Morning" this weekend.

    Buffett said the country's debt is a "lower percentage of GDP than it was when we came out of World War II. You've got to think about in relation to GDP."

    Here's why debt-to-GDP is what Buffett watches.

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  • U.S. Debt Ceiling: Government "Borrows" Pension Funds to Avoid Default Uncle Sam piggy small

    The U.S. Treasury, in order to avoid default, has resorted to an eyebrow-raising move: it has borrowed from the federal employee pension fund as the country nears its debt ceiling.

    The U.S. government stopped investing in the federal employee pension fund Tuesday "to avoid breaching the statutory debt limit," according to a letter Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner sent to Congress.

    Geithner said that the move will free up some $156 billion in borrowing authority, while policy leaders in Washington wrangle over raising the $16.4 trillion debt limit.

    Geithner promised the fund would be "made whole once the debt limit is increased," and maintains that federal employees and retirees would not be affected by the action.

    But an IOU from the federal government isn't very settling for those relying on the fund for retirement.

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