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This Patent Portfolio "Dream Team" Just Got Even Better

When we recommended micro-cap tech play eOn Communications Corp. (NasdaqCM: EONC) last month, we told you to expect a pretty wild ride.

And that’s just what we’ve seen…

  • Featured Story

    Black Monday Stock Market Crash Returns to Haunt 2014

    Stock Market crash 2014

    Chart watchers have noticed an eerie pattern - the bull market of 1982, which ended in the Black Monday stock market crash of 1987, looks way too much like the current bull market.

    And while no one can predict the markets for certain, the chart lines for the two bull markets have given many market analysts pause, including Money Morning Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald.

    Even if we don't get a full-blown crash, a correction is long overdue.

    Here's what investors need to do now.
  • Bull Market

  • What's Next for This Bull Market Will Give Main Street Investors a Rude Awakening Awakening

    So far today U.S. stocks aren't celebrating the 5-year anniversary of the bull market, which technically speaking began on March 9, 2009.

    Will they rally by the end of the day, in a formal salute to moving onwards and upwards?
  • Frank Holmes: Trying to Stop a Bull Market Has Risks Bull

    U.S. stocks have been on a tear. The S&P 500 Index has climbed a surprising 23% so far this year, as a global synchronized recovery takes shape and funds flow back to equities.

    As I often say, investors take risks when they try to stop a bull run, and plenty of data suggest you might regret taking that action this year.

    Consider the optimistic views from Joshua Brown, i.e. The Reformed Broker, as we have "all the rocket fuel we need for an explosion." There's no election, no war in Syria, and no taper talk. Banks are highly capitalized, stocks around the world are cheap and hedge funds' short positions are the highest since January, says Brown.

    To continue reading, please click here...
  • Why this Ivy League Professor Sees Dow Hitting 18,000 Chart up exponential

    The bears predicting a stock market crash have it all wrong.

    So says Jeremy Siegel, finance professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School and author of "Stocks for the Long Run." He predicts the Dow - which closed yesterday (Wednesday) at a new record high 14,455.28 - will continue the bull market run, ending this year in the 16,000 to 17,000 range.

    For 2014, he says, the "best bet goal" is the Dow will climb to 18,000.

    And the well-known bull has nearly 150 years of data to back up his bold prediction.

    Here's why Siegel is so bullish.  

    To continue reading, please click here...

    Read More...
  • The Looming Bear Market: What You Can do That Washington Can't and Wall Street Won't I just finished a battery of media appearances on Fox Business, Bloomberg, BNN and CNBC Asia, and without exception I was asked about two things: President Barack Obama's jobs bill and the U.S. Federal Reserve's "QE3."

    The first thing investors and analysts alike want to know is whether or not the president's jobs bill will work. The answer to that question is "no" - not as it stands, anyway.

    The second question is whether or not Fed Chairman Ben S. Bernanke will further extend the central bank to help the economy. Well, I do think the Fed will intervene, but I don't believe for a second that the central bank's intervention will help the U.S. economy.

    As a result, we're likely to see stocks enter into a bear market and retest their March 2009 lows.

    I know that's a terrifying thought. But to be perfectly honest, there's nothing President Obama or Bernanke can do at this point. If companies don't want to spend the $2 trillion worth of cash they're hoarding, there's very little the government can do to encourage them to loosen their purse-strings.

    That said, I want to give you five specific steps to take to protect yourself from the looming bear market, preserve your sanity - and even profit.

    But before I get to that, you need to understand the dangers that are fast approaching.

    A Roadblock to Recovery

    President Obama and Chairman Bernanke can toss all the money they want at the economy. But no amount of spending can change the fact that we need the following three things to get our market moving again. They are:

    1. Sustained demand.
    2. A solution to the European sovereign debt crisis.
    3. And a bottom in housing prices.
    As it currently stands, the U.S. economy will be lucky to log 1% growth this year, which is even lower than the anemic 1.5% I predicted in my annual forecast in January.

    That's pathetic for a nation that spent more than $1.4 trillion of borrowed money on "stimulus." This lackluster growth is also evidence that the Obama administration's $800 billion stimulus plan - and the Fed's two rounds of quantitative easing - did absolutely nothing to salvage our economy.

    Citizens are scared silly. Businesses are uncertain. They're uncertain of regulatory changes, uncertain of taxes, and uncertain about their overall economic environment. So they're doing what rational people do when confronted with the unknown: They're hunkering down.

    And with good reason.

    The typical U.S. family got poorer during the past 10 years due to a decade-long income decline. Median household income fell to $49,995 last year, and is now 7% below where it was in 2000. The number of people living in poverty has risen to 15.1%, the highest level since the U.S. Census began tracking this information in 1959.

    It should also be noted that a large portion of that decline is directly attributable to inflation, which the Fed continues to assert is "transitory."

    Out of the Fire...

    You may be holding out hope that the president's jobs plan will help turn things around - but it won't.

    To continue reading, please click here...

    Read More...
  • It Pays to Prepare for a Stock-Market Reversal – Even With New Bull-Market Highs In a stunning display of determination (or simple greed), U.S. stock prices are once again at new highs - despite problems in the Middle East, out-of-control government deficits throughout the world, an increasingly inflated China and the looming end to the U.S. Federal Reserve's free-money boondoggle, otherwise known as "QE2."

    Should you be worried about a stock-market reversal?

    I know that I am.

    But here's the thing: While there's no question that a stock-market breakdown could derail the best of investing intentions, it doesn't have to derail your financial future. More to the point, if you understand when stock-market "turning points" are likely to occur, you can establish positions or trades ahead of time that will yield profits when those expected transitions actually come to pass.

    Read More...
  • The U.S. Bull Market: At Two Years and Counting, Here's How to Invest The current bull market in U.S. stocks celebrated its second birthday on March 9.

    With human beings, a 2-year-old is a lusty toddler with a lot more growing to do. For a bull-market-run in stocks, however - particularly a bull market as vigorous as this one has been - the two-year mark is a good time to start searching for some serious signs of aging.

    Don't get me wrong: The U.S. bull market could continue - indeed, it probably will continue for some time to come.

    But we are almost certainly much closer to its end than we are to its March 9, 2009 day of birth.

    And that reality means that we need to invest in a certain way.

    To see Hutchinson's full strategy, please read on…

    Read More...
  • Can the Bull Market in Stocks Get Running as Uncertainty Recedes? Stocks rose briskly in the second half of last week as investors cheered the return of General Motors Co. (NYSE: GM) shares to the Street and the return of Irish budget officials to the debt negotiating table. It's amazing how quickly people forget what a horrible company GM was and what a mess Dublin has made of governance. In a twinkling of an eye, all was forgiven. Must be a bull market.

    To find out whether or not the bull market still has legs, read on... Read More...
  • What to Expect on Wall Street as Nervous Investors Navigate a Slowing Economic Recovery Wall Street was hit hard last week with gloomy data that has kept buying interest stalled and investors spooked over a slow economic recovery.

    Stocks slipped over the past week after investors learned from government reports that jobs are getting scarcer than straw hats in a wind tunnel, and it isn't always sunny in Philadelphia.

    The big-cap indexes lost around 1%, while safe haven assets like gold and the U.S. dollar were buoyant. The best investment around for the week was the U.S. long bond, up 2%.

    To read what’s in store after last week’s gloomy data, click here.

    Read More...
  • The S&P 500 is Set for a Surge… But It Won't Come Easy Stocks zipped higher in the past week, capping the first four-day rally since early 2009. Get out the party hats and confetti, right? Bears tried to knock shares lower on Tuesday and early Thursday, but after they failed bids hit the tape in a big way and gave it lift.

    Technically, stocks continued to move out of the invalidated head-and-shoulders pattern we've discussed lately. With support below at 1,040, the S&P 500 Index should be good for a run to resistance at the 1,095 to 1,115 area in coming days as long as earnings reports and corporate outlooks are supportive.
    But the bulls have their work cut out for them there.

    To find out more about where stocks are headed next read on...

    Read More...
  • Can Bulls Lift a Market Threatened By Uncertainty Surrounding U.S. Stimulus Measures? Stocks spilled the past week like water over a broken dam as investors priced in more evidence that consumers, businesses and home-buyers have gone on strike despite U.S. stimulus measures and record-cheap interest rates that have put mortgages, car loans and store-credit costs at 100-year lows. In the five-day span, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 2.5% and the Standard & Poor's 500 Index sank 3.6%; Nasdaq and Russell 2000 Index all fell 3.2%.

    Catalyst for the latest spasm of selling came from disappointing news on durable goods sales and initial jobless claims, and weak earnings news or outlooks from consumer-facing companies BedBath & Beyond Inc.(Nasdaq: BBBY),Darden Restaurants, Inc.(NYSE: DRI),Lennar Corp.(NYSE: LEN) andNike, Inc.(NYSE: NKE).

    All of the major U.S. and global indexes are now below their 200-day averages for the first time since early June.

    Read More...
  • Bull Market Update: U.S. Stocks Are Hanging By a Thread – But It's a Tough Thread If you ask me, the current bull market in U.S. stocks is hanging by a thread.

    In fact, a decline that takes the Standard & Poor's 500 Index down below the 1,040 level - roughly 7% below where it closed yesterday (Wednesday) - would probably murder the bull-market case for stocks.

    But until that decline actually occurs, don't rule the bulls out for the count.

    That "thread" may be tougher than you think.

    To see what's in store for U.S. stocks, please read on... Read More...
  • The Bull Market Will Pick Up Pace When Retail Investors Finally Climb Aboard Data shows that retail investors have not yet bought into the bull market. But when they eventually do regain their confidence, the market will soar to new heights.

    Consider this: Trim Tabs Investment Research, a boutique data analysis firm in the San Francisco Bay area that's popular with hedge fund managers, last week declared that it had turned fully bullish from cautiously bullish on U.S. stocks. The firm thus boosted its recommended equity exposure to 100% long from 50% long.

    The reason for Trim Tabs' change of posture: Its unique blend of macroeconomic data shows the U.S. economy making a gradual recovery, corporate buybacks are picking up during earnings season, and demand indicators are increasingly bullish.

    Let's spend some time understanding their point of view, as the firm is influential among large institutions.

    Read More...
  • Should Investors Sell in May and Go Away, or Ride the Bull Awhile Longer? I'm sure you have heard the old saw that it's a smart idea to "sell in May and go away."

    That concept is based on the notion that the May-to-November span provides a weak environment for investors. I have already heard the cry go up recently because the major indexes are already up a lot more than anyone expected, and this would seem to be a convenient time to take profits.

    Yet like most old market adages, there's not much substance to the concept if you take a good look at history. Read More...
  • A V-Shaped Recovery? Don't Bet On It Corporate profits appear to have returned in full, manufacturing is picking up around the world, commodities prices have rallied and the Standard & Poor's 500 Index is up about 60% since last March.

    That makes a pretty compelling case for what some analysts are calling a "V-shaped" recovery. But even with all the momentum the economic recovery has accrued, that kind of talk may be a bit premature.

    Read More...
  • Stocks – Led by Apple Inc. – On a Hot Bull Run No Investor Should Miss Stocks flipped out late Friday morning following an announcement of Greece's decision to seek help from the European Union and International Monetary Fund. But by the end of the session, cooler heads began to prevail and the major indexes ended well into the black, continuing the bull run.

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average, Standard & Poor's 500 and Nasdaq all closed about 1.1% lower for the session, but the week's results were a lot better: flat for the Dow and S&P 500, up 0.75% for the S&P Midcap 400 and up 1.7% for the S&P Smallcap 600.

    Overseas large-caps ended the week flat, though China sank another 1%. Our own top choice overseas fared better, asMarket Vectors IndonesiaIndex (NYSE: IDX) closed the week up 4%. Another star off the week overseas was iShares MSCI Turkey Index Fund (NYSE: TUR), up 3%.

    Read More...