U.S. jobs report

August Jobs Report Flop: Smallest Gain This Year with Only 142,000 Jobs Added

August jobs report

The August jobs report was disappointing indeed, missing estimates by a whopping 83,000.

Last month employers added the fewest jobs in eight months, the U.S. Department of Labor reported Friday. Payrolls increased by an uninspiring 142,000 in August, handily missing the median forecast for an increase of 230,000.

But that headline number wasn't even the worst part of the report...

July Jobs Report: Growth Slows, Slack Lingers in U.S. Labor Market

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U.S. job growth slowed more than expected in July, resulting in an unexpected rise in the unemployment rate, according to the July jobs report just released today (Friday) by the U.S. Department of Labor.

After surging (a revised) 298,000 in June, nonfarm payrolls increased by 209,000 last month. The unemployment rate ticked up to 6.2% from 6.1%.

Here are 12 key takeaways from the closely watched July jobs report…

The Stock Market Today's Top Stories, Including DIS, FOX, GE, AAL and More

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Stock market today, July 17, 2014: The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished up yesterday (Wednesday) for its 15th record-breaking close in 2014. U.S. Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen testified before Congress, reiterating that the economy remains vulnerable to a struggling job market and stagnating wages - two reasons why the central bank will continue its loose monetary policy in 2014.

Here are the top headlines in the stock market today you should know to make your Thursday profitable...

U.S. Labor Department Jobs Report: Big Gains in June, but Still Lagging Behind

U.S. Labor Department jobs report

Optimism surrounded Thursday's release of the June U.S. Labor Department Jobs Report, but although the numbers were better than expected, we still have plenty to worry about, and the economy is still in trouble.

Employers added 288,000 jobs in June. The unemployment rate dipped to 6.1% from 6.3%, the lowest level since September 2008.

Despite some encouraging figures in the jobs report, it is still peppered with troubling data - like these dismal numbers...

March Jobs Report: Still Stuck in Second Gear

U.S. Labor Department jobs report The highly anticipated March jobs report out today supported what U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said earlier this week: The job market is not back to normal and the Fed has more to do on the unemployment front. This morning, the U.S. government announced that the economy barely missed expectations of 200,000 new jobs […]

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February Jobs Report: More Job Seekers, Still Too Few Jobs

Jobs Report-Employment listing

Following two months of dismal growth, the February jobs report suggests an improving labor landscape. But despite the numbers, the employment picture remains cloudy at best.

The Labor Department reported today (Friday) that employers added 175,000 jobs last month, beating expectations of 150,000. Yet the February figure is still well below the 280,000 jobs created in the same month a year ago.

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January Jobs Report: Even the Cooked Numbers Are Bad

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The January jobs report is another sign of how weak our economic recovery is - and it's not even taking into account all of the unemployed.

Friday, the Labor Department reported employers added 113,000 jobs last month. The unemployment rate ticked down to 6.6% from 6.7% in January, a rate not seen in five years.

But we know that number doesn't tell the full story...

The decline in the unemployment rate is due to an ongoing trend: discouraged workers exiting the labor force.

The actual unemployment rate, the U-6 rate, which includes "marginally attached workers plus total employed part time for economic reasons," remains at an unhealthy 12.7%.

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Here's How Many Jobs We Need to Add Every Month for the Next Four Years

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Money Morning Capital Wave Strategist Shah Gilani joined Stuart Varney of FOX Business' "Varney & Co." today (Wednesday) to go over the bungled and belated September jobs report.

This month's Bureau of Labor Statistics' report, initially scheduled for release Oct. 4, was delayed until Oct. 22 on account of the government shutdown. But it looks like the extra days didn't help sort out jobs data - the BLS is now under fire for releasing numbers that simply don't add up.

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What the August Jobs Report Means for "Septaper"

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Investors generally took the lackluster August jobs report as a sign the U.S. Federal Reserve will hold off announcing a tapering of its $85 billion a month bond program at the Sept. 17-18 Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting.

The Labor Department reported today (Friday) that U.S. job growth last month increased by a less-than-expected 169,000 jobs, adding to signs that economic growth likely slowed in the third quarter. The unemployment rate dipped in August to 7.3% from 7.4%. Economists were looking for employers to have increased headcount in August some 180,000.

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The "Part Time-ification" of America: How We've Been Conned Again

By now, you've had a few days to digest the "wonderful" jobs numbers reported from Washington last Friday.

Well, don't get too excited about the economy. We've been conned again.

First off, 59% of all jobs created this year are in 3 sectors: Leisure/Hospitality, Retail Trade and Administrative/Waste Services. Wages in those sectors have fallen by 0.7%. These jobs pay an average of $15.80 per hour versus the $23.98 average hourly wage. Which means "jobs creation" just equals cheaper labor.

The American jobs participation rate is at 34-year lows and falling, as people give up and leave the workforce.

Underemployment is between 14% and 15% and rising.

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U.S. Jobs Report: How Unemployment is Really 14%

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Employers added just 88,000 jobs in March, according to the U.S. jobs report released Friday, hiring at the slowest pace since June 2012.

The number was a huge miss. Analysts expected a gain of 200,000.

"We all over shot it," Austan Goolsbee, former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisors in U.S. President Barack Obama's first administration, said on CNBC. "This is a punch to the gut. I mean, this is not a good number."

Since the government's way of calculating unemployment is frighteningly inaccurate, even with such a small amount of jobs added the unemployment rate fell from 7.7% to 7.6%.

That's because the labor force participation rate slipped from 63.5% to 63.3% -- the lowest level since 1979.

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