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Is Your Vehicle on the "Most Hackable" List?

My first car was a bone-stock 1929 Ford Model A coupe that has been in the family since it was new.

My late grandfather – a machinist on the Lehigh Valley Railroad – drove the car as his everyday vehicle until the late 1940s. My Dad restored the car in his mid-teens and drove it through his high-school years.

And I did the same…

  • Featured Story

    Get Your Share of an Extra Trillion Euros

    When Gutenberg introduced the printing press to Europe, he never could have imagined this.
    Like so many revolutionary inventions, it's proven a doubled-edged sword.

    The U.S. Fed has begun winding down its latest QE program (for now), and the baton's already been passed to Japan with its own massive easing campaign.

    But lack of inflation and concerns about outright deflation are again gripping Europe.

    So the latest "noise" from the IMF and European Central Bank (ECB) is signaling that Europe is about to crank up its own printing press.


    While the implications may be serious, the profit opportunities are even bigger...
  • Currencies

  • The Clock Is Ticking on This Massive Currency Shift Last week I was asked by a Wall Street Insights & Indictments reader about a new challenge to the U.S. role in the global economy that few are considering. It's a dominant role we've held since the latter part of World War II, and for 70 years it's gone largely unchallenged.

    Until now.

    The question isn't complicated, but it will be disturbing to some...
  • Stay Ahead of This (Massive) Currency Shift China's political and economic presence surges daily. Lockstep with that surge is the growing significance of its currency. Along with China's emergence as the world's second-largest economy, its yuan recently displaced the euro and became the second-most used currency for international trade. Chinese leaders are intent on internationalizing their currency by growing its acceptance, perhaps even challenging the U.S. dollar as the new reserve currency, a trend I've highlighted here before. To reach that goal, new yuan trading centers are being established. But the location of the next major trading hub is almost certainly not where you'd expect. And the implications will redefine the power centers of global commerce... Full Story Read More...
  • Why the Winklevoss Bitcoin ETF Is a Game-Changer winklevoss-001 One of the things holding many people back from investing in Bitcoin is the technical knowledge required to buy and sell the actual Bitcoins. But the Winklevoss Twins are about to change all that when their Bitcoin ETF gets approved by the SEC later this year. Here's how it will work...
  • The Golden Yuan Is Coming – Here's How to Play It The U.S. dollar has been the world's de facto reserve currency for almost 90 years. But this financial dominance may be nearing its end. In recent years, China's been floating the idea the yuan should take on the dollar's role as the world's reserve currency. In fact, the Chinese have already negotiated numerous bilateral trade deals that completely bypass it. And they've even called for efforts to "de-Americanize" the global economy. Whatever happens, China's economic rise foreshadows increased influence. It's a trend that not only has serious implications, but also great profit opportunities, if you know what to expect... Read More...
  • Time to Buy These "Out of Print" Assets From the Editor: We've been tracking this threat for years, ever since Keith Fitz-Gerald brought it to your attention back in January 2010. Today, Resources Specialist Peter Krauth weighs in on some recent developments in this story, because three of the commodities he covers can protect you. The Fed can't print these things... Here's Peter:
    Central banks may have foolish policies, but central bankers are no dummies.
    They know exactly what they're doing. They even comprehend a few of the implications, too.
    Which is why it's interesting that some American central bankers have suggested doing away with the debt ceiling altogether.
    Famed investor Marc Faber recently said, "The question is not tapering. The question is at what point will they increase the asset purchases to say $150 [billion], $200 [billion], a trillion dollars a month."
    Faber expects the Fed's current QE4 to become "QE4-ever."
    That could mean years of money printing and ultra-low rates.
    Even bond king Bill Gross recently chimed in his latest monthly outlook that "The United States (and global economy) may have to get used to financially repressive - and therefore low policy rates - for decades to come."
    Either way, don't depend on the Fed to save you. You can save yourself

    And now you'll need to...
  • The Best Currencies to Invest in for 2013 Sure, the U.S. dollar has been rising – but that will end. So, here’s your all-star list of the best currencies to invest in for 2013. Read more... Read More...
  • How to Profit From the Currency War Money pyramid If you want to know how to profit from the currency war, just look to Japan.

    That's because Japan's aggressive move to cheapen the yen in order to stimulate its own economy is working.

    Of course, Money Morning's Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald predicted this would happen months ago, and he was dead on.

    But even if you missed the first moves in this currency war, it's not too late to profit.

    To hear Keith explain how investors can still take advantage of the "race to the bottom" and profit from the global currency war, click here.

    Read More...
  • Why Your Financial Future Will Be Built Upon the Chinese Yuan Currency yuan It’s the Yuan’s world, and the West is just living in it.
    It’s no coincidence that Yuan-settled trade jumped 41.3% - to nearly three trillion Yuan - in 2012, after it increased by more than 300% in 2011.
    In fact, since June 2005, the Chinese Yuan has risen 24.66% against the U.S. dollar, backed in part by 1.3 billion consumers and real assets. To borrow a tech term, China's currency is the world’s new “killer app.”
    Here’s how you can make it part of your investing future Read More...
  • Is Japan About to Fire the First Shots in a 1930s Style Currency War? The great currency risk right now is not the "race to the bottom" you hear about, but a full-blown 1930s-style currency war.
    This is not front-page news yet, but I have a sneaking suspicion it will be shortly...
    It's going to blindside Washington and most of Europe, where central bankers, politicians, and economists fail to recognize that events from nearly 100 years ago are now primed to repeat themselves. Worse, it will devastate an entire class of investors who have put their faith in the current economic dogma of endless bailouts and money printing.
    I'll explain what happened in 1931 in a moment. But first, ironically, this currency war won't start because of international problems. Instead, it will be touched off in earnest because of domestic concerns - only not American ones.
    Here are three reasons I think Japan will fire the first shots. Read More...
  • Here's the Surprising Winner of the Currency Wars With the Bank of Japan now buying government bonds and targeting an inflation rate of 2%, a global "race to the bottom" is on again.
    Japan's latest move has sparked new fears of a currency war. They're competing with the Fed's commitment to "quantitative easing" and the ECB's promise to buy dodgy Mediterranean economies' bonds.
    However, the mathematical reality is that the world's major currencies can't all be catastrophically weak against each other. It's impossible.
    Like any other war, this one won't end well, either.
    But the winner may surprise you... Read More...
  • Can the U.S Economy "de-couple" from the Eurozone Debt Crisis? As the Eurozone teeters on the edge of a breakup, it begs the question: Can the U.S economy "de-couple" from the Eurozone debt crisis?

    Ultimately, the answer comes down to fate of the euro. It's the linchpin to everything.

    From the point of view of one who has travelled fairly frequently in the Eurozone I can tell you I find the euro very convenient indeed.

    In my London merchant banking days, when I used to go on marketing trips around continental Europe, I found that while the excellent European train service was a pleasure to use, the proliferation of local currencies made travelling a pain.

    There was nothing more annoying than to be on a long-distance train that had just crossed the border from Belgium to Germany at Aachen, only to discover that I could not enjoy the excellent Deutsche Bundesbahn bockwrst and fine local beer because I had only sterling and Belgian francs in my wallet, but no deutschemarks!

    The other problem was that after a long trip I ended up with my wallet stuffed with small amounts of ten different currencies, none of which could be changed back into anything useful because the bank charges ate up their value.

    In southern Europe, local exchange controls were a pain too.

    Walking through Madrid airport with $25,000 of legitimately earned pesetas in bills which could not be transferred to Britain through the banking system was far too exciting for my liking.

    From a British merchant banker's point of view, it was thus very convenient when all the local foreigners converted to the same currency, rather than lots of different ones.

    After that, you needed only two compartments in your wallet: one for British money and the other for foreign money. Then you could travel all over Europe without worrying about changing currencies.

    It was a very 19th century feeling, almost as good as being back on the gold standard!

    To continue reading, please click here... Read More...
  • Why the Eurozone Debt Crisis Never Really Went Away How many times have we been told the Eurozone debt crisis is resolved, only to have it turn up again like a bad penny?

    Last year's string of good news/ bad news on the Eurozone debt crisis had the markets going up and down like a yo-yo until the routine grew so tiresome that most people stopped paying attention.

    But while the crisis faded into the background, it never really went way.

    Remedies that were sold as solutions haven't solved a thing.

    The celebrated bailouts of countries like Portugal, Ireland, and especially Greece have served mainly to postpone real solutions that would be far more painful.

    "The Eurozone politicians in their infinite wisdom have concluded that it is easier to prolong the agony than to take their medicine," said Money Morning Chief Investment strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald.

    In fact, the Eurozone debt crisis is getting worse.

    Collective debt among the 17 member nations is on the rise, having increased from 85.3% of GDP (gross domestic product) in 2010 to 87.2% last year. That's the highest level in the history of the Eurozone.

    Unemployment in the Eurozone rose in March to 10.9%, up from 10.8% in February and 9.9% a year ago. Manufacturing also declined last month, as new orders fell for the 11th month in a row.

    And the austerity imposed on the troubled PIIGS (Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece and Spain) to bring their budget deficits and debts under control have actually made the situation worse.

    "It's done no good at all," Fitz-Gerald said of the Eurozone's efforts to deal with the debt crisis. "It's an absolute travesty."

    The steep and sudden cuts in spending are pushing most of Europe back into a recession, which will eventually be felt here at home.

    To continue reading, please click here...

    Read More...
  • International M&A Boom Fueled by Global Currency War

    A binge of mergers and acquisitions (M&A) is being fueled by the global currency war, which has increased the value of emerging market currencies.
    The value of worldwide M&A totaled $1.75 trillion during the first nine months of 2010, a 21% increase from comparable 2009 levels and the strongest nine month period for M&A since 2008, according to Thomson Reuters.

    But mergers and acquisitions involving companies located in the emerging markets skyrocketed by 62.9% during the same period over 2009, totaling $480.7 billion. During the first three quarters of 2010, emerging markets accounted for 27.4% of worldwide M&A volume compared to 21% during the comparable period in 2009.
    And companies are showing more willingness to venture across borders to find the resources they're after.

    M&A activity in deals across international borders has surged during the first nine months of 2010, totaling $723 billion accounting for 41.2% of overall M&A volume, compared to 26.1% last year at this time.
    Read More...

  • Money Morning Mailbag: Japan's Rising Yen Struggle Signals Need for Industrial Shift The yen strengthened as much as 82.75 per dollar Wednesday, fueled by speculation that the U.S. Federal Reserve would buy more government bonds after a drop in U.S. payrolls.

    The yen's rise came after the Bank of Japan tried yet again this week to devalue its currency. On Tuesday the Bank of Japan lowered the benchmark interest rate to "virtually zero," and announced a $60 billion (5 trillion yen) plan to buy government bonds - similar to the 'quantitative easing' policy employed by the U.S. Federal Reserve.

    "With today's decision, the Bank of Japan paved the path for the next step," Junko Nishioka, chief economist at RBS Securities Japan Ltd. in Tokyo told Bloomberg News on Tuesday. "What will be critical will be how foreign-exchange rates move as a result," along with the impact of any additional easing by the Federal Reserve, she said.

    Read More...
  • What's In a Name: Can the U.S. Afford to Call China a Currency Manipulator? It seems like every six months the debate over China's currency, the yuan, reaches a fevered pitch: The Washington bureaucrats threaten to label China a "currency manipulator" and Beijing threatens to dump its U.S. debt holdings.

    Then, with the imminent approach of a major inflection point - be it a key international summit or major financial report - both sides grudgingly agree that a modest appreciation of the yuan would be mutually beneficial.

    However, things could be slightly different this time around. China has routinely ducked calls to revalue its currency, and in doing so greatly agitated the West.

    Read More...