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This Patent Portfolio "Dream Team" Just Got Even Better

When we recommended micro-cap tech play eOn Communications Corp. (NasdaqCM: EONC) last month, we told you to expect a pretty wild ride.

And that’s just what we’ve seen…

  • Featured Story

    Why Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Stock Is Going to $100

    stocks to buy now

    It usually pays to heed the advice of Money Morning Capital Wave Strategist Shah Gilani when looking for stocks to buy now.

    Since Gilani, a retired hedge-fund manager who runs the Capital Wave Forecast and Short Side Fortunes advisory services here at Money Map Press, first recommended Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) stock last summer, MSFT is up about 16%.

    But Gilani believes MSFT can get all the way to $100 a share.

    In this Q&A with Money Morning Executive Editor William Patalon III, Gilani explains why....
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  • Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Stock at 14-Year High, Mobile Success Would Send It Higher Nasdaq-MSFT

    Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) stock reached its highest price since 2000 today (Tuesday) following reports that the tech company will release a version of its "Office" software for Apple Inc.'s (Nasdaq: AAPL) iPad.

    In morning trading, MSFT touched $39.90 per share. That was a 5% increase from yesterday's close.

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  • Two Numbers Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Doesn't Want Investors to See Hands block view

    Microsoft's (Nasdaq: MSFT) new CEO Satya Nadella could bring the company what it's been missing, as we recently pointed out, but Nadella will have to tackle two very troubling numbers just reported for Microsoft.

    These are figures that give us a glimpse of what could prevent MSFT stock from climbing in 2014 following its 40.9% rise last year.

    These numbers were just released last week - and they're ugly.

    Here's the story...
  • Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Stock Could Get a Lift From New CEO Nadella Microsoft After showing some signs of life last year, Microsoft Corp. stock could get another boost in 2014 when a new CEO takes the helm - and the job could be going to a company insider. And while Satya Nadella may not be perfect, he has several strengths that could be just the tonic for Microsoft's stock...
  • Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Stock Jumps 4% on Earnings, but Didn’t Get This Key Info Microsoft_CES_2009

    Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) stock has been drifting lower this week as investors don't know what to expect from the Q2 2014 earnings due out today (Thursday) after the bell.

    MSFT stock fell 0.66% Wednesday to $35.93. The stock is down nearly 4% year to date.

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  • The Next Microsoft CEO Will Look a Lot Like This Businessman back Microsoft shareholders suffered through a lost decade of near stagnation under the leadership of CEO Steve Ballmer. Now that Ballmer is set to retire, Microsoft has an opportunity to choose a CEO who can do a much better job of converting the tech titan's potential into shareholder value. The company has at least five names on its list, but this is the person with the most realistic shot at turning Microsoft around...
  • Is This Man the Next Microsoft CEO? 09272013KFG

    There's a shake-up brewing in the business world. Al Mulally, CEO of a rejuvenated, refocused, and red-hot Ford Motor Company, may be heading over to Microsoft, where CEO Steve Ballmer is retreating under fire. Under Mulally, Ford went from the brink of bankruptcy and irrelevance to one of the the most solid performers on Wall Street. Can Mulally do the same thing for Microsoft and move it back into the "Buy" column? Keith Fitz-Gerald joins FOX Business' Neil Cavuto to tackle this question, along with McDonalds' newest strategy and the effect of the looming government shutdown on Wall Street.

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  • Is Investing In Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Stock Finally A Good Idea? 08262013KFG1

    What would it take for Money Morning Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald to buy Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) stock?

    The company's shares jumped 7% on Friday on news that often-embattled and rarely popular CEO Steve Ballmer will retire in the next 12 months. News that Ballmer will finallytake a bow was music to Wall Street's ears, apparently, but Fitz-Gerald was singing a different tune.

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  • Why the Microsoft Reorganization Plan Won't Fix What's Wrong Deck Chairs Q

    With a Microsoft reorganization plan expected to be announced on Thursday, investors at this point must be wondering: will it matter?

    Shareholders of Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) have only recently gotten a glimmer of hope. Microsoft stock had languished in the $25-$30 range for more than a decade until this year, which has seen MSFT pop about 30%.

    Although extremely profitable, Microsoft under the leadership of CEO Steve Ballmer has struggled to move beyond its core products of Windows and Office, which still deliver nearly all of those profits.

    What this new Microsoft reorganization plan needs to do is reorient the Redmond, WA-based company toward future engines of growth, such as the mobile wave of smartphones and tablets, cloud computing and big data.

    Insiders say Ballmer intends the new structure to provide "functional coherence" and will align the company into divisions based on services and devices.

    But given Ballmer's spotty track record and Microsoft's unwieldy size (98,000 employees), it's not a given that any major structural overhaul will do much good in addressing the company's real problems.

    As one worried Microsoft insider told The Wall Street Journal's All Things D: "If this is all about an org chart and not how to build great products, it does not matter what org chart Ballmer presents. Consumers buy products, not management structure."

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  • This Microsoft Invention Could Finally Destroy the Cable Company Monopoly Vintage Television

    For too long we've been held hostage by our local cable companies. Their monopoly-like status has left us chained to spotty service, inexplicable rate hikes and laughable customer service.

    But a new product is about to trigger a revolution - or, evolution - that could end the cable company reign.

    Today (Tuesday), Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) revealed its next-gen Xbox, called the Xbox One, a device which may prove capable of replacing your cable box.

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  • Buy, Sell or Hold: Is Microsoft Stock About to Break Out of Its 10-Year Slumber? Despite apathy from Wall Street, it has the potential to become a major competitor in markets like smartphones, tablets, and enterprise solutions. Here's the (surprising) fuel for Microsoft's future growth. Read More...
  • Why the Fate of Microsoft Stock Hinges on Windows 8 Any hope of jolting Microsoft stock out of years of stagnation lies with the success of its latest attempts to capture a slice of mobile computing.

    Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) is only a bit player in mobile, currently dominated by devices running Apple Inc.'s (Nasdaq: AAPL) iOS and Google Inc.'s (Nasdaq: GOOG) Android. That's why the company now has a new mobile strategy, with the focal point being Windows 8, the latest version of Microsoft's dominant computer operating system.

    Windows 8 is optimized for the mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones that have stolen the thunder from traditional PCs, a market Microsoft long dominated.

    Microsoft has also ventured into mobile hardware with its new Surface tablet.

    Now Microsoft is betting that the Surface tablet will turn heads and that Windows 8 will put it back in the mobile OS game by luring hardware makers away from Android.

    "I don't control the macro-environment, but there's a huge opportunity in the explosion of devices," Microsoft Chief Financial Officer Peter Klein told Reuters. "There's demand for compelling devices and a connected set of cloud experiences. That's what Windows 8 is all about."

    The Redmond, WA-based company must succeed in mobile to secure a new source of growth capable of moving Microsoft stock out of the doldrums where it has languished for more than a decade. The current 10-year return for MSFT is -6.39% -- yes, negative. Rolling back to November 2001 puts the return on Microsoft stock at -15.75%.

    Owners of Microsoft stock can only cross their fingers and hope the bet pays off.

    How Mobile Success Could Help Microsoft Stock

    Microsoft had little choice but to shift its attention to mobile computing. That's where the money is in tech today.

    Apple's profits have soared from about $2 billion in FY 2006 to $41.7 billion in FY 2012, almost entirely on the strength of the iPhone and iPad.

    More recently, Korean-based Samsung Electronics (PINK: SSNLF) has emerged as the dominant Android hardware maker, with its profits rocketing 91% in the September quarter on strong sales of its Galaxy series of smartphones.

    Sales growth in mobile devices has soared over the past few years. Research firm Gartner expects combined global sales of tablets and smartphones to reach 821 million units this year and rise 46% to pass the 1.2 billion mark next year - triple that of global PC sales.

    So far Microsoft hasn't been able to grab much of this market, with its Windows operating systems on just 2.4% of smartphones, and about 4% of tablets.

    But these projections by research firm IDC see that changing with Windows 8...

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  • Why Sinofsky Left Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) It hasn't even been three weeks since the hugely hyped release of Windows 8, and Windows division president Steven Sinofsky has left Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT).

    The abrupt departure has many questioning the success of Windows 8, Sinofsky's relationship with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, and the evolution of the software giant.

    "It is a little surprising to see a departure of someone at this level in charge of so many products with such immediacy, with no transition period. Microsoft is going to enter another period of management transition," Michael Gartenberg, an analyst at Gartner Inc. told Bloomberg News.

    During his tenure at Microsoft, Sinofsky won accolades for leading intricate software projects and making sure they were delivered on time.

    It had been widely speculated that Sinofsky, a 23-year Microsoft veteran, would take the reins when Ballmer stepped down.

    But according to insiders, Sinofsky and Ballmer didn't always see eye-to-eye.

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  • More Proof Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Must Dump CEO Steve Ballmer You can add the failed acquisition of online advertising firm aQuantive to the mounting evidence that Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) should oust CEO Steve Ballmer.

    Microsoft announced Monday night that it would take a $6.2 billion charge this quarter to reflect the destruction of nearly all of the value of the $6.3 billion deal it made in 2007.

    The write-down will more than wipe out Microsoft's profit for the June quarter, which analysts had projected to be about $5.25 billion.

    The deal was supposed to help Microsoft catch up to Google Inc. (Nasdaq: GOOG) in the race to profit from online search.

    However, Google's U.S. share of search remains about 67%, aided by its own $3.2 billion acquisition of DoubleClick the same year Microsoft bought aQuantive.

    Microsoft has managed to increase Bing's share to about 15.4%, but most of its gains have come from search partner Yahoo! Inc. (Nasdaq: YHOO).

    And Microsoft continues to bleed cash from search, losing $10.4 billion since 2007 and $2 billion in the past year alone.

    Google, meanwhile, used its acquisition of DoubleClick to double its profits to $9.7 billion last year.

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  • 8 Reasons Why Mimi Would Sell Microsoft (Nasdaq:MSFT) and Dump Steve Ballmer One day in 1983, my dad asked me a question over dinner after a long day at work.

    He wanted to know what I knew about a little computer company called Microsoft. It was the brainchild of the son of one of his partners at Bogle & Gates, William H. Gates, Sr.

    "Not much," I replied.

    But I did tell my dad that I loved using MS-DOS in the computer lab with my friends. I was a card-carrying member of the nerd herd back in the day, so I spent a lot of time there and knew Microsoft's fledgling PC-based software pretty well.

    My grandmother Mimi, though, had a different point of view. You've heard me mention her before.

    She's the one who was widowed at an early age and became a savvy global investor long before people ever thought to look at the bigger picture.

    Mimi didn't care that the buzz was about the MS-DOS language or even about computers. Having grown up in the Depression, she believed that what people would do with the technology was far more valuable.

    She said she had confidence that Sr.'s son, Bill Gates Jr., understood this -- which is why she invested heavily in the Microsoft IPO in 1986. Enough said.

    Today, though, I think she'd voice an equally strong opinion about Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) CEO Steve Ballmer. In fact, I think she'd fire him. Here's why....

    8 Reasons Why Steve Ballmer Must Go

    1. Ballmer took over Microsoft 12 years ago when the stock was about $60. Now it struggles to maintain $30. Microsoft has $58.16 billion in cash and this is the best Steve Ballmer can do?

    2. Office and Windows are dying. Once the business world's de facto standard, both are being replaced by cheap, easy-to-operate software, much of which is actually free as well as compatible. This is a big problem considering that, according to the Wall Street Journal, roughly 85% of Microsoft's revenue is coming from just two products: Windows and Office.

    3. The company isn't innovating fast enough or aggressively enough. What's more, it's attempting to compensate for its own shortcomings with increasingly ill-conceived acquisitions. For instance, Microsoft forked over $605 million for 18% of the Barnes and Noble Nook e-reader and still has no real ability to compete with Amazon's Kindle. It also couldn't seal the deal with Yahoo. Despite a sizable head start using Yahoo's core search technology, Bing has a mere 15% of the search market today. Ballmer waited nearly four years to respond to the iPad and his "Surface" tablet was ho-hum when it could have been jaw dropping. One more: Microsoft paid $8.5 billion in cash for Skype. Apparently the fact that Skype was not profitable didn't matter. Ballmer's track record suggests to me that he buys businesses that nobody else "must have."

    4. Microsoft's Internet offerings remain wannabes and are highly priced at that. Take Yammer. Microsoft just paid $1.2 billion through the nose to acquire a company that was valued at $600 million last fall when it raised $85 million in a venture offering. Team Ballmer plans to integrate it into Office on the assumption that somehow the Microsoft marriage will endear the brand to customers anxious to socialize business. I think they're delusional. Most Microsoft users I know, including myself, are actively planning to move away from the legacy software we've used for years the first instant we can in favor of software we actually like to use!
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  • Time to Like Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) is up almost 20% this year - so is it time to buy? Money Morning Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald joined Fox Business' "Varney & Co." to talk about this rise. Fitz-Gerald also talked about Yahoo (Nasdaq: YHOO) and its increasing pile of issues.

    To find out what to do with these tech stocks, check out this video.

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