1. Prof. MAD | October 17, 2011

    Why would you ever short a stock when you can buy puts?

  2. Lavel | October 17, 2011

    You guys are awesome.

  3. Adrian | October 17, 2011

    I am a UK investor. I have only just found your site. Not only have I found your ideas interesting, but I also find it good to see views that are rather like my own from the other side of the "Pond". Thank you

  4. Allen Novotny | October 17, 2011

    I happen to be a subscriber to your newsletter and the Oxford club. Do you have ANY idea how confusing it is when you are warning everyone to sell into strength because there could be a total collapse when Alex Green and Louis Basenese is saying stay in the game and don't let the doomsayers get you out of the market? What is an average investor to do when you guys are sending out such conflicting info? Frankly, I am more than sick of it and might cancel my subscriptions.

    Allen

  5. Hilary Wipf | October 17, 2011

    I find your article on european banks interesting,have been studying this for some time,if we look
    at what happened in the 1921 in Europe,then in the 30's ueropes banks were in trouble and had a huge effect on the globe.This funding they are doing,I agree is not large enough,its a temporary band aid.
    I am a canadian investing in large canadian oil and gas stocks,plus pipelines

  6. Bill Lemoine | October 17, 2011

    Your fear-laced piece is more of the same pessimistic, wrong-headed policy to stop the economic slide and induce normally rational people to tank the markets. Reread the same conservative policies applied to post-1929 conditions and see how they produced Depression. The solution is liquidity–proposed for Euro Zone banks. There does need to be a means test for banks to focus on the weak banks, and ignore the strong ones. If Europe follows Geithner and Bernancke's Fed, they'll be better off later. Our economists can't seem to understand the lessons of the 30's Depression and may be doomed to repeat the political fascism that follows 'retraction' policies. Better consult a broader range of economic/market advisors before putting this "fearful" analysis into the ether.

  7. Dr. Hans-Dieter von Senff | October 18, 2011

    Keith Fitz-Gerald you are right of course except for one thing. The Banks are only the financial expression of the capitalist system, which is rapidly heading for the garbage dump of history. Do I need to explain ?

    The Banks are but an expression of the capitalist system. If the Banks are bankrupt, then the capitalist system as a whole is bankrupt and a major Depression is just around the corner, that cannot be fixed any longer by any government unless with the printing press. No manipulation by the banks will help, no manipulation by the U.S. Government will help. If the banks cannot make a profit, industry also cannot
    make a profit, and without profit banks as well as industry are stuffed. This incidentaly applies also to the governments, which will, by necessity be replaced by the people.

    This was written in 1848 and still holds true. I remember George Bush proclaiming that "Communism is dead." His Son, bailed out the banks and opened the way not to fascism in the U.S. of A., but to socialism. The question is?: Will the American peole remember ? The world will be holding its breath !!!

    • Ron B. | October 18, 2011

      You could also buy into the argument that the Politicians we see today are simply Party people who have been educated from a young age to become elected as leaders without any real life experience.
      I cannot name any post war politician in any country today who has had to work a 9-5 job on a regular income and thus meet others of their community and all levels of that community.
      The result of this is the present financial circus where those in charge really have no idea . What the USA needs is another "Baroness Thatcher". Perhaps this Herman guy has some idea? Afterall he doesn't fit the present mold does he?

  8. Simon P | October 18, 2011

    So, let me get this straight, gold goes down as banks raise capital to meet margin calls, but it goes up as everyone seeks a safe haven from fiat currencies

    And in times of fear about debt and inflation, the world flees to one of the most indebted and overprinted of fiat currencies, the US dollar

    Go figure. I'll just sit this one out, on a pile of gold

    We sure live in weird times

  9. Don J. Opp | October 19, 2011

    Let,s continue to rearrange the chairs, on the TITANIC !!!

  10. Seasoned Trader | October 22, 2011

    But the markets have had months to digest Euro dysentery, and have discounted much of what is to come. The record numbers of Bears are still stuck perseverating over the malaise. The markets will not oblige them and will teach yet another lesson.

  11. shamrock | January 23, 2012

    Doom and gloom, all we need is a little love, not money.

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