Five Reasons the Dow's New Highs Are "Bull-o-ney" and What to Do About It

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While many investors want to celebrate the Dow hitting seven straight new all-time highs, things are not exactly as they appear.

Today I want to talk about why the hoopla surrounding the Dow is misplaced and what that means for your money. Then, I want to offer a few thoughts on what's next for the markets.

Let's start with the problems behind the Dow's numbers. There are a few things you should know:

  1. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is made up of just 30 stocks representing approximately 19.66% of the total market capitalization of the NYSE and Nasdaq, combined.

Despite the fanfare, this is hardly representative of the much larger picture, which is why I encourage investors to track the far broader and much more indicative S&P 500 instead.

  2. The Dow is not inflation adjusted, so comparing it to previous price levels is like comparing oranges to bananas at best.

In fact, the Dow remains approximately 10% below its all-time inflation-adjusted high and would need to top 15,731.54 to really qualify for the record books, according to CNBC.

  3. The Dow is price weighted, so big companies artificially distort the rise.

Take Microsoft Corporation (NasdaqGS: MSFT) and International Business Machines Corporation (NYSE: IBM), for example. The former is trading at $27.80, while the latter is trading at $209.14. According to the Dow methodology, this means that IBM has roughly 6.6 times the impact that MSFT does despite the fact that both companies share a market cap of approximately $233 billion.

  4. The movement in the Dow doesn't actually reflect consumers who feel poorer.

Average inflation-adjusted private sector earnings have been essentially flat for the last five years, and median U.S. household income continues to drop. It's off 3.6% in January alone. Unemployment remains chronically high and inflation is hardly under control, as Team Bernanke asserts.

The last time the Dow was at these levels, regular gas averaged $2.75 a gallon. Now it's $3.73. U.S. debt as a percentage of GDP was just under 40%. Now it's nearly 75%. Consumer confidence was 99.5. Today it's 69.6.

Further, 70% of Americans reported adjusting their spending plans to cope with the 2% payroll tax hike that came into effect January 1st, 2013.

  5. The Fed's meddling is creating artificially low interest rates and false liquidity.

Both are creating an updraft sustained by nothing more than an addiction to cheap money.

Speaking of which, the Fed is still pumping $85 billion a month into the economy on top of the $2 trillion it's already spent. There's a huge disconnect between the markets and the economy. The former is pulling ahead while the latter has more holes in it than Swiss cheese.

Ergo...despite being one of the most watched, commented upon and observed indexes in the world, the Dow is basically irrelevant.

So what can you do about it?

Plenty - "bull-o-ney" or not...

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