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We'll Tell You When It's Time to Tap Tesla

A week ago today, in a strategy story aimed at helping you survive and thrive in today’s whipsaw markets, Chief Investment Strategist Keith Fitz-Gerald told us to put Tesla Motors Inc. (Nasdaq: TSLA) on our “watch lists” for a likely future purchase.

“BP, Tesla is a definite ‘shopping list’ stock,” Keith told me back then. “We’ve been nibbling at it here, and have played it successfully several times. But it’s not yet at the point where I’m ready to jump all the way in. I think my rationale behind Tesla remains upbeat. I mean, you’ve got a real winning combination here – a disruptive sales model, a CEO who’s the most innovative guy on the planet, all the capital in the world that can be brought to bear. I don’t give a rat’s [tail] that New Jersey won’t let the company sell its cars there. There are much bigger opportunities. Wait ’til you see what the company does with China.”

Sometimes I think Keith has a “crystal ball” in his hip pocket…

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Banking Archives - Page 4 of 22 - Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From- Money Morning - Only the News You Can Profit From.

  • HSBC Fine for Money Laundering is Largest Bank Penalty in U.S. History

    The HSBC fine for money laundering charges reached a record $1.92 billion as Europe's biggest bank settled charges in an agreement with the U.S. Justice Department.

    The fine is the largest penalty ever imposed on a bank from the Justice Department.

    The Justice Department had accused HSBC Holdings PLC of illegally laundering money for Mexican drug cartels and with violating sanctions by doing business with countries including Iran, Cuba, Libya, Sudan and Myanmar, according to Reuters.

    In a statement, HSBC Chief Executive Stuart Gulliver said: "We accept responsibility for our past mistakes. We have said we are profoundly sorry for them, and we do so again. The HSBC of today is a fundamentally different organization from the one that made those mistakes."

    Under new senior leadership over the past two years, Gulliver said, "we have been taking concrete steps to put right what went wrong and to participate actively with government authorities in bringing to light and addressing these matters."

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Why Ben Bernanke Could Learn a Thing or Two From Mark Carney

    Now that President Barack Obama has been reelected, Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's easy money policies may well be with us for the next four years.

    And even if Obama replaces Bernanke when his term ends in January 2014, he's likely to choose another soft-money acolyte like Fed Vice-chairman Janet Yellen to lead the Fed.

    For believers in sound money like me, that's something of a gloomy prospect.

    As for the rest of the world, the prospects for higher interest rates don't look too good, either.

    However, on Monday I did catch a glimmer of light when it was announced the Bank of England's new Governor is going to be Mark Carney, the former head of the Bank of Canada.

    Now I'll be the first to admit that, at first glance, Carney doesn't look too promising.

    He did, after all, spend 13 years at Goldman Sachs (NYSE: GS). And we all know the track record of Goldman Sachs has been nothing short of appalling.

    The bank itself made a bundle by shorting the housing market on the way down and persuaded its alumnus Hank Paulson to bail out its dodgy AIG credit default swaps with $13 billion of taxpayer money.

    However, the truth is Carney has been out of Goldman since 2004, and his track record at the Bank of Canada has been very good indeed.

    To Carney's credit, he didn't cut interest rates as far as the Fed and has actually raised them part of the way back. What's more, Carney only did $20 billion of "quantitative easing" bond purchases in 2009, at the height of the crisis, and has since sold the extra bonds back to the market.

    In the aftermath, Canada's economy has notably outperformed the U.S. economy over the last five years, and continues to do so even though house prices there are currently looking wobbly.

    Ben Bernanke could learn a thing or two here.

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • The Next Lehman: Why 71% of the Big Money Fears the Black Swan

    Five years have passed since the financial crisis brought the world to its knees.

    Gone are likes of Lehman Brothers and Bear Stearns among others who were driven into ruin by the epic collapse of the housing bubble.

    In the aftermath, life appears– on the surface at least– to be returning to some form of normal. Normal, that is, if you happen to have a job.

    It may be anemic, but there is real growth. And the truth is even housing may have bottomed.

    Admittedly, it's not exactly sunny, but it's no where near as dark as it was in 2008 either.

    Or is it?….

    According to a recent survey by State Street Global Advisors, there's still plenty to worry about-especially in the sordid world of finance.

    In fact, the world's 3rd biggest money manager said 71% of investors worldwide are afraid the next Lehman could strike within the next twelve months.

    Keep in mind, we're not talking about small retail investors here. Not at all.

    We're talking about some of the largest and best-informed, most sophisticated pension funds, private banks, and asset managers in the world and the wide majority of them think a " black-swan" type event could strike before this time next year.

    A Black Swan Rerun

    What do they think could be the trigger for this event?

    Their biggest fears revolve around the next global recession, a potential euro break-up, or another episode of bank insolvency.

    Other concerns cited were a slowing Chinese economy, an oil price shock, or the risks of asset bubbles from unending stimulus. Thanks to ongoing debasement wars, the asset class they feel holds the biggest risk at the moment is the currency markets.

    These elite asset managers are not alone their fears either .

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Here's What Really Happened to Citigroup's (NYSE:C) Vikram Pandit

    The only big deal about Vikram Pandit "stepping down" as Citigroup Inc. (NYSE:C) CEO and his removal from the board is that it didn't happen sooner.

    The truth is he didn't leave voluntarily. He was given an ultimatum by the "new" board of directors: resign or be fired.

    Poor old Vikram. This was a setup from the start.

    He ended up at Citigroup when the mega-bank bought his Old Lane hedge fund for more than $800 million.

    Poor old Vik pocketed about $165 million in the sale and continued to run the fund, some say into the ground, until Citi shut it down.

    In 2007, my favorite Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (NYSE:GS) ex-CEO Robert Rubin (who after pandering to all the big banks in the country as Secretary of the Treasury in Bill Clinton's administration, then pimped himself to Citigroup after allowing Citibank to merge with Sandy Weill's Travelers insurance conglomerate (that owned Salomon Smith Barney) in an illegal deal that required Congress to kill prudent banking laws (Glass-Steagall) to make it legal actually handpicked Vikram to run the bank.

    Super rich-boy Bob Rubin, of course, had nothing to do with running Citibank after making it the mega-bank it became as a result of the merger; he was merely a special consultant to the board, or some B.S. like that.

    But here's what really happened…

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Why Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit Was Forced Out (NYSE: C)

    Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit announced today (Tuesday) he has made an abrupt departure from the troubled bank, the day after it reported third-quarter earnings that beat estimates.

    The story became more interesting as the day wore on after it was announced he was forced out by the board.

    The theories as to why Pandit would be asked to leave got juicier as the Citigroup Inc. (NYSE: C) CEO's exit was paired with the co-resignation of Citi COO John Havens, a long-time associate of Pandit.

    Mike Holland, chairman of New York-based Holland & Co, which oversees more than $4 billion of assets told Reuters, "It's not a shock that [Pandit] is no longer there, but the surprise is this is all happening very quickly. Why is he leaving so quickly? I'm not a Citi shareholder, but if I were I'd be disappointed that Havens is gone, in some ways more than Pandit."

    The timing hinted the two exits were not simply a natural transition, but instead related to some skeletons lurking in the bank's boardroom.

    Just as quick and startling was the immediate removal of Pandit's name and photo from Citigroup's Website.

    The swift announcement that Michael Corbat, previously chief executive for Europe, Middle East and Africa, would replace Pandit as Citi's CEO and board member also raised some eyebrows.

    So what could've caused this sudden changing of the guard?

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) Earnings: 34% Profit Gain Thanks to this Business

    JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) reported third-quarter earnings today (Friday) of $1.40 a share, beating increased estimates of $1.21 a share.

    JPM, the largest U.S. bank by assets, earned a record $5.7 billion in the quarter, 34% higher than the $4.3 billion or $1.02 reported for the same period a year ago. The strong revenue results also easily topped forecasts.

    The impressive numbers were thanks to the bank's robust and growing mortgage and credit business. Mortgage volume was up 29%, and core loan growth grew 10%.

    The notable uptick in both segments bodes well for the housing market and U.S. economy, suggesting the real estate market is staging a recovery and consumers are getting more comfortable spending.

    "Importantly, we believe the housing market has turned the corner," CEO Jamie Dimon said in a statement.

    As a result of improved mortgage and credit conditions, JPM reduced its reserves (cushion) for loan losses by $900 million.

    "All in, we think it's a good quarter for JP Morgan Chase, and other banks should see some of the same benefits," Glenn Schoor, an analyst at Nomura Securities told the Financial Times.

    Here's a closer look into the third quarter.

    JPM Earnings: London Whale Trade Still a Big Deal

    Still under scrutiny from the dicey derivative bets made in the bank's London Chief Investment Office, the bank's losses from the failed hedge strategy grew in the third quarter by $449 million.

    Since the trade, dubbed the London Whale, was uncovered in the second quarter, losses have cost JPM some $6 billion. Under the worst case scenario, the bank said the losses could widen by $1.7 billion.

    CEO Dimon said in a conference call that the bank doesn't anticipate further losses of that enormity and added that the bank has appreciatively reduced the scope of risks in the underlying portfolio.

    Anxious to put the matter to rest and behind him, Dimon called renewed focus on the losses a "sideshow" in an otherwise stellar quarter.

    "Hopefully we're not going to be talking about it anymore," he said in a statement.

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Stock Market Today: Banks Net Record Profits, But Stocks Slip

    The stock market today is trying to end what has been a negative week on a positive note.

    Markets have traded down all week on global economic concerns and today are being held back by JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM) and Wells Fargo & Co. (NYSE: WFC) even though the two financial giants posted record earnings.

    Here's what's bringing those stocks down and why consumer sentiment is at a five-year high:

    • Banks slide amid record earnings- JPMorgan and Wells Fargo each reported record quarterly profits but neither stock is surging on the results. Wells reported third-quarter net income of $4.94 billion, or 88 cents per share, up from $4.06 billion, or 72 cents a year ago and JPMorgan announced third-quarter earnings of 5.71 billion, or $1.40 a share, up from $4.26 billion, or $1.02 a share a year earlier. The record results were spurred by homeowners taking advantage of lower interest rates in order to refinance their mortgages. "The one big positive is clearly mortgage origination revenues," Richard Staite, an analyst at Atlantic Equities LLP in London, told Bloomberg News in an interview before results were announced. "Rates will remain at this level or potentially drop further and ultimately that will drive a recovery in the housing market."

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • JPMorgan (NYSE: JPM) Earnings Preview: Five Things to Watch

    The JPMorgan Chase (NYSE: JPM) earnings report due tomorrow (Friday) gives CEO Jamie Dimon a chance to put the huge trading losses from the "London Whale" behind him.

    The "London Whale" trades are the are hedged strategy that went bad and cost the bank nearly $6 billion. JPM took the majority of the hit in the second quarter.

    JPM stock tumbled in the weeks that followed after details were uncovered and trading losses swelled. Since then, shares have staged a notable recovery rising from $34.59 on July 11 to the recent price of $42.25.

    Now JPM earnings have a chance to shake off the scandal and impress investors.

    Expectations have grown for Friday's numbers, with the consensus estimate raised from $1.16 per share to projections of $1.21 per share. Estimates have increased in the last three months from $1.04.

    Analysts are predicting earnings of $4.74 per share for the fiscal year, with revenue for the year to come in at $97.76 billion.

    The fresh forecasts are 18.6% better from the same quarter a year ago when JPM posted earnings of $1.02 per share.

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Who Says Money Can't Buy You Love? Not the Banksters

    Remember Tim Pawlenty, the former two-time Governor of Minnesota?

    Remember when he made a bid for the Presidency this go-round, but bowed out after a poor showing in Iowa?

    Remember that during his brief run he acted like he was a Wall Street critic, admonishing the Street to "get its snout out of the trough?" Remember that?

    Remember that T.P. became national co-chair of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's run for the roses?

    Do you remember that T.P. was a top contender for the V.P. slot that eventually went to Paul Ryan?

    Don't worry if you don't remember any of that stuff about T.P. because none of his past politics matter (he's a Republican don't you know?) now that he has a new job.

    Oh yeah, with less than 45 days before his buddy Mitt faces off against a resurgent incumbent named Obama – you probably don't remember because it just happened a few days ago – T.P. quit the campaign for a new gig.

    You can't blame him. Everybody loves money, and the lure of a reportedly near $2 million salary is mighty enticing. So he took the job.

    Guess what he's up to now?

    To continue reading, please click here…

  • Banks Are Setting Us Up Again, This Time The Fall Could Be $2.6 Trillion or More

    Just five years after they played a primary role in engineering the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, America's big banks are quietly setting the world up to do it all over again.

    Only this go-round the costs will be far higher and the damage much worse. This time the fall could be $2.6 trillion or more.

    Let me explain.

    It started back in the mid-2000s. Wall Street was busy packaging low-rated subprime loans into securitized offerings that were somehow worth more than the sum of their parts.

    In reality, what they were doing was little more than laundering toxic debt while raking in obscene profits along the way.

    You know the rest of the story as well as I do. Not long after, the stuff hit the proverbial fan and it was not evenly distributed.

    Well here we go again…

    Both JPMorgan and Bank of America are quietly marketing a new scheme designed to "transform" sub-par assets into quality holdings that will serve as treasury-quality collateral needed to meet the new capital requirements that come into effect in 2013 as part of the Dodd-Frank Act.

    Wall Street Is Up to Its Old Tricks

    This may sound complicated but it's not. It works like this.

    When you trade on margin like these mega-institutions do, you are required to post collateral to offset counterparty risk. That way, if the trade busts and you are unable to deliver on your side of the trade, there is recourse.

    If you have a mortgage or a car loan, you know what I'm talking about. Your lender can seize both if you default or otherwise fail to meet your payment obligations.

    Trading collateral works the same way. In years past, trading collateral has most commonly taken the form of U.S. treasuries (or other securities) that meet stringent requirements with regard to ratings, liquidity, value and pricing.

    However, since the financial crisis began, treasuries are in increasingly short supply. Investors and traders who have preferred safety over return are hoarding them.

    Consequently, traders like JPMorgan's London-based "whale," Bruno Iksil, who want to write increasingly bigger, more sophisticated trades are in bind. They find themselves unable to trade because many times the clients they represent can't post the collateral needed to "gun" the trades.

    As you might imagine, Wall Street doesn't like that because it means billions in profits and bonuses get lost as trading volumes drop.

    So they've gone to the unregulated woodshed again and come up with yet more financial hocus pocus designed to circumvent rules in the name of profits.

    At the same time, they're once again hiding the true extent of the risks they are taking – and that's the outrageous part.

    These same banks that have already driven the world to the brink of financial oblivion and been bailed out once may need another $2.6 trillion dollars or more to backstop the unregulated $648 trillion derivatives playground they've created for themselves.

    And don't think for a minute that your money isn't at risk either…

    To continue reading, please click here…